We provide a large benchmark dataset consisting of about: 3.5 million keystroke events; 57.1 million data-points for accelerometer and gyroscope each; and 1.7 million data-points for swipes. Data was collected between April 2017 and June 2017 after the required IRB approval. Data from 117 participants, in a session lasting between 2 to 2.5 hours each, performing multiple activities such as: typing (free and fixed text), gait (walking, upstairs and downstairs) and swiping activities while using desktop, phone and tablet is shared.

Instructions: 

Detailed description of all data files is provided in the *BBMAS_README.pdf* file along with the dataset. 

 

 

Please cite:

[1] Amith K. Belman and Vir V. Phoha. 2020. Discriminative Power of Typing Features on Desktops, Tablets, and Phones for User Identification. ACM Trans. Priv. Secur. Volume 23,Issue 1, Article 4 (February 2020), 36 pages. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1145/3377404

[2]Amith K. Belman, Li Wang, S. S. Iyengar, Pawel Sniatala, Robert Wright, Robert Dora, Jacob Baldwin, Zhanpeng Jin and Vir V. Phoha, "Insights from BB-MAS -- A Large Dataset for Typing, Gait and Swipes of the Same Person on Desktop, Tablet and Phone", arXiv:1912.02736 , 2019. 

[3] Amith K. Belman, Li Wang, Sundaraja S. Iyengar, Pawel Sniatala, Robert Wright, Robert Dora, Jacob Baldwin, Zhanpeng Jin, Vir V. Phoha, "SU-AIS BB-MAS (Syracuse University and Assured Information Security - Behavioral Biometrics Multi-device and multi-Activity data from Same users) Dataset ", IEEE Dataport, 2019. [Online]. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.21227/rpaz-0h66

 

 

 

 

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measurements

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This study was conducted in Mayaguez – Puerto Rico, and an area of around 18 Km2 was covered, which were determined using the following classification of places:

·         Main Avenues: Wide public ways that has hospitals, vegetation, buildings, on either side

·         Open Places: Mall parking lots and public plazas

·         Streets & Roads: Dense residential and commercial areas on both sides

     Vendor             Equipment                  Description      

KEYSIGHT®      N9343C                    Handheld Spectrum Analyzer

Instructions: 

Instructions:

***For CSV Files:

You can open the CSV files on Microsoft Excel or any other. In these files you will find the following information in different columns:

- Hour

- Longitude

- Latitude

- Altitude

- Individually the information of each of the 20 scanned frequencies (center frequency, bandwidth, power in dBm).

 

***For KML Files:

You can open simply this interactive files using the Google Earth Pro software by clicking on file, open, and selecting the desired KML file.

At this point, the interactive map must be located on the place of the points and showing several colored ellipses between green for the weakest power level, and red for the strongest. If you press each point, you can see the complete information of each location.

 

The frequencies used in this study are shown below:

Survey Frequencies (Bandwidth 4% --> Patch Antenna)

 

Central Frequency (MHz) / Band Description

300Federal Goverment

325ISM

333

375

525DTV

601WMTS

6344GLTE

708Low-SMH

735

835GSM-850 (MTx)

882GSM-850 (BTx)

1733AWS-1700

1880PCS-1900

1960

2133AWS-1700

2155AWS-3

2354WCS

24372.4G-WiFi

2559BRS/EBS

58005G-WiFi

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7200 .csv files, each containing a 10 kHz recording of a 1 ms lasting 100 hz sound, recorded centimeterwise in a 20 cm x 60 cm locating range on a table. 3600 files (3 at each of the 1200 different positions) are without an obstacle between the loudspeaker and the microphone, 3600 RIR recordings are affected by the changes of the object (a book). The OOLA is initially trained offline in batch mode by the first instance of the RIR recordings without the book. Then it learns online in an incremental mode how the RIR changes by the book.

Instructions: 

folder 'load and preprocess offline data': matlab sourcecodes and raw/working offline (no additional obstacle) data files

folder 'lvq and kmeans test': matlab sourcecodes to test and compare in-sample failure with and without LVQ

folder 'online data load and preprocess': matlab sourcecodes and raw/working online (additional obstacle) data files

folder 'OOL': matlab sourcecodes configurable for case 1-4

folder 'OOL2': matlab sourcecodes for case 5

folder 'plots': plots and simulations

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Real sampled data of a moving vehicle is provided.

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Multi-modal Exercises Dataset is a multi- sensor, multi-modal dataset, implemented to benchmark Human Activity Recognition(HAR) and Multi-modal Fusion algorithms. Collection of this dataset was inspired by the need for recognising and evaluating quality of exercise performance to support patients with Musculoskeletal Disorders(MSD).The MEx Dataset contains data from 25 people recorded with four sensors, 2 accelerometers, a pressure mat and a depth camera.

Instructions: 

The MEx Multi-modal Exercise dataset contains data of 7 different physiotherapy exercises, performed by 30 subjects recorded with 2 accelerometers, a pressure mat and a depth camera.

Application

The dataset can be used for exercise recognition, exercise quality assessment and exercise counting, by developing algorithms for pre-processing, feature extraction, multi-modal sensor fusion, segmentation and classification.

 

Data collection method

Each subject was given a sheet of 7 exercises with instructions to perform the exercise at the beginning of the session. At the beginning of each exercise the researcher demonstrated the exercise to the subject, then the subject performed the exercise for maximum 60 seconds while being recorded with four sensors. During the recording, the researcher did not give any advice or kept count or time to enforce a rhythm.

 

Sensors

Obbrec Astra Depth Camera 

-       sampling frequency – 15Hz 

-       frame size – 240x320

 

Sensing Tex Pressure Mat

-       sampling frequency – 15Hz

-       frame size – 32*16

Axivity AX3 3-Axis Logging Accelerometer

-       sampling frequency – 100Hz

-       range – 8g

 

Sensor Placement

All the exercises were performed lying down on the mat while the subject wearing two accelerometers on the wrist and the thigh. The depth camera was placed above the subject facing down-words recording an aerial view. Top of the depth camera frame was aligned with the top of the pressure mat frame and the subject’s shoulders such that the face will not be included in the depth camera video.

 

Data folder

MEx folder has four folders, one for each sensor. Inside each sensor folder,

30 folders can be found, one for each subject. In each subject folder, 8 files can be found for each exercise with 2 files for exercise 4 as it is performed on two sides. (The user 22 will only have 7 files as they performed the exercise 4 on only one side.)  One line in the data files correspond to one timestamped and sensory data.

 

Attribute Information

 

The 4 columns in the act and acw files is organized as follows:

1 – timestamp

2 – x value

3 – y value

4 – z value

Min value = -8

Max value = +8

 

The 513 columns in the pm file is organized as follows:

1 - timestamp

2-513 – pressure mat data frame (32x16)

Min value – 0

Max value – 1

 

The 193 columns in the dc file is organized as follows:

1 - timestamp

2-193 – depth camera data frame (12x16)

 

dc data frame is scaled down from 240x320 to 12x16 using the OpenCV resize algorithm

Min value – 0

Max value – 1

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WiFi measurements dataset for WiFi fingerprint indoor localization compiled on the first and ground floors of the Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Informática, in Seville, Spain. The facility has 24.000 m² approximately, although only accessible areas were compiled.

Instructions: 

The training dataset consists of 7175 fingerprints collected from 489 different locations. Each fingerprint is stored as a JSON object corresponding to an unique scan with the following values:

  • _id: contains an unique identifier for the fingerprint, uses to differentiate one fingerprint from another.

  • avgMagneticMagnitude: average magnetic magnitude during scanning with the mobile phone sensor, although this value is not used is provided in case it was useful.

  • location: object with the coordinates of the real world in which the sample was captured.

    • floor: number indicating the floor in which the sample was captured.

    • lat: latitude as part of the coordinate at which the sample was captured.

    • lon: longitude as part of the coordinate at which the sample was captured.

  • timestamp: UNIX timestamp in which the sample was captured.

  • userId: identifier of the user who captured the sample, this value will be anonymized so that it is not directly identifiable but remains unique.

  • wifiDevices: list of APs appearing in the sample.

    • bssid: unique AP identifier, this value will be anonymized so that it is not directly identifiable but remains unique.

    • frequency: AP WiFi frequency.

    • level: AP WiFi signal strength (RSSI).

    • ssid: AP name, this value will be anonymized so that it is not directly identifiable but can be used to compare APs with the same name.

The training dataset was compiled by taking samples at every 3 meters on average with 15 samples per location. The time at each location was approximately 40 seconds performing consecutive scans with a bq Aquaris E5 4G device using Android stock 6.0.1 without making any movements during the process. The following is an example of a fingerprint, the list of WiFi devices has been shortened to two APs, as it was too long.

{
"_id":"5cc81e8ac28d6d2533709425",
"avgMagneticMagnitude":40.615368,
"location":{
"floor":1,
"lat": 37.357746,
"lon": -5.9878354
},
"timestamp":1556618890,
"userId":"USER-0",
"wifiDevices":[
{
"bssid":"AP-BSSID-0",
"frequency":2457,
"level":-75,
"ssid":"AP-SSID-0"
},
...
{
"bssid":"AP-BSSID-23",
"frequency":2437,
"level":-64,
"ssid":"AP-SSID-6"
}
]
}

The testing dataset consists of two tests with a total of 390 samples in random locations yet in areas captured by the training dataset and with different devices. This dataset is grouped by tests and within it are the captured samples, so both the individual error and the average error can be obtained, besides recalculating this error to test different algorithms. Each test is stored as a JSON object corresponding to an unique scan with the following values:

  • _id: contains an unique identifier for the test, uses to differentiate one test from another.

  • userId: identifier of the user who performed the test, this value will be anonymized so that it is not directly identifiable but remains unique.

  • startTimestamp: UNIX timestamp that indicates when the test was started.

  • endTimestamp: UNIX timestamp that indicates when the test was ended.

  • samples: list of samples taken during testing.

    • timestamp: UNIX timestamp that indicates when the sample was collected.

    • real: object with the coordinates of the real world in which the sample was captured.

      • floor: number indicating the floor in which the sample was captured.

      • lat: latitude as part of the coordinate at which the sample was captured.

      • lon: longitude as part of the coordinate at which the sample was captured.

    • predicted: object with the predicted coordinates of the real world.

      • floor: number indicating the floor predicted.

      • lat: latitude as part of the predicted coordinate.

      • lon: longitude as part of the predicted coordinate.

    • wifiDevices: list of APs appearing in the sample.

      • bssid: unique AP identifier, this value will be anonymized so that it is not directly identifiable but remains unique.

      • frequency: AP WiFi frequency.

      • level: AP WiFi signal strength (RSSI).

      • ssid: AP name, this value will be anonymized so that it is not directly identifiable but can be used to compare APs with the same name.

    • error: approximate distance between the actual location and the predicted location.

  • error: average distance between the actual locations and the predicted locations.

The testing dataset was compiled two days after the training phase by taking samples at random locations with an average of 3 meters, performing a single scan per location. The samples were taken with two devices, which represent each of the tests individually, a bq Aquaris E5 4G device using Android stock 6.0.1 and a Xiaomi Redmi 4X using Android 7.1.2 with MIUI 10 Global 9.5.16. Before taking the sample, 5 seconds were waited without making any movements. The following is an example of a test entry, the list of samples has been shortened to one sample and wifi devices has been shortened to two APs, as it was too long.

{
"_id":"5d13245e279a550b548e3bfe",
"userId":"USER-0",
"startTimestamp": 1557212799.6555429,
"endTimestamp": 1557222705.0710876,
"samples":[
{
"timestamp":1557212799.6552203,
"real":{
"floor":0,
"lat":37.358547,
"lon":-5.9867215
},
"predicted":{
"floor":0,
"lat":37.358547,
"lon":-5.9868493
},
"wifiDevices":[
{
"bssid":"AP-BSSID-156",
"frequency":2412,
"level":-80,
"ssid":"AP-SSID-5"
},
...
{
"bssid":"AP-BSSID-146",
"frequency":2462,
"level":-36,
"ssid":"AP-SSID-6"
}
],
"error":5.233510868645419
},
...
],
"error":3.975672826048607
}

In order to provide more information about the device used in each fingerprint of the dataset, the following relationship between users and devices is given:

USER-0: Xiaomi Redmi 4X (Android 7.1.2 with MIUI 10 Global 9.5.16)

USER-1: BQ Aquaris E5 4G (Android stock 6.0.1)

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Herein we present a multi-threshold-based constant micro-increment control strategy to detect and suppress the slip for the prosthetic hand, and to minimize the loading force increment after the stabilization. The proposed strategy primarily encompasses slipping process model, multi-threshold detection method, constant micro-increment controller and a preset filter. First and foremost, a slipping process model is proposed that involves the nonlinear and noise characteristics of the system.

Instructions: 

There are two sets of experiments, a total of four videos, which need to be decompressed and watched.

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111 Views

The videos demonstrate 2D thermal gradient mappings based on two pairs of 50 µm x- an y- thin film thermocouple (TFTC) sensors. We investigate thin film thermocouples (TFTC) asthermal gradient sensors at the micro-scale and demonstrate two-dimensional dynamic thermal gradient mapping for features as small as 20 μm. Pairs of x-direction and y-direction thermocouples sense the thermal gradient while another calibrates the Seebeck coefficient as S = 20.33±0.01μV/K. The smallest detectable temperature difference is 10 mK, and the sensitivity is 0.5 mK/μm.

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Abstractــــ Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) typically have been consumed high energy in monitoring and radio communication trends. Furthermore, data diffusion modes in WSN typically generate errors such as noisy values, incorrect measurements or missing information, which minimize the standard of performance in such dynamic systems.

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