CRAWDAD vt/maniac

Citation Author(s):
Amr
Hilal
Virginia Tech
Jawwad N
Chattha
Virginia Tech
Vivek
Srivastava
Virginia Tech
Michael S
Thompson
Bucknell University
Allen B
MacKenzie
Virginia Tech
Luiz A
DaSilva
Virginia Tech
Pallavi
Saraswati
Virginia Tech
Submitted by:
CRAWDAD Team
Last updated:
Thu, 07/21/2011 - 08:00
DOI:
10.15783/C7WG6T
Data Format:
License:
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Abstract 

Dataset of routing and topology traces collected during MANIAC Challenge.

The dataset comprises routing and topology traces collected during the Mobile Ad hoc Networks Interoperability And Cooperation (MANIAC) Challenges, held on November 25-26th 2007 in conjunction with IEEE Globecom 2007 and on March 8, 2009 in conjunction with IEEE PerCom 2009.

date/time of measurement start: 2007-11-25

date/time of measurement end: 2007-11-26

collection environment: The dataset comprises routing and topology traces collected during the Mobile Ad hoc Networks Interoperability And Cooperation (MANIAC) Challenges, held on November 25-26th 2007 in conjunction with IEEE Globecom 2007 and on March 8, 2009 in conjunction with IEEE PerCom 2009. The MANIAC Challenge is an NSF-funded competition to better understand cooperation and interoperability in ad hoc networks. Competing teams of students/researchers come together to form an ad hoc network. It has been held once in 2007 and once in 2009.

network configuration: In the MANIAC Challenges 2007 and 2009, the organizers generated traffic destined to each team. Teams were judged based on how much of the traffic destined to them made it through the network, how little energy they consumed in forwarding traffic and a subjective evaluation of the quality of their solution's design.

data collection methodology: In the MANIAC Challenge competition, an adhoc network comprising of nodes from all participating teams was formed and data was logged during three runs of the competition. The data included traces for the routing tables generated at each node for each time instant during the tests, and topology traces generated from the route logs to record topology changes at each time instant.

change: Traceset vt/maniac/2009 has been added.

ch node: vt/maniac/2009

Tracesets

vt/maniac/2007

Traceset of routing and topology traces collected during MANIAC Challenge 2007.

  • description: The data comprises routing and topology traces collected during the Mobile Ad hoc Networks Interoperability And Cooperation (MANIAC) Challenge, held on November 25-26th 2007 in conjunction with IEEE Globecom 2007.
  • measurement purpose: Network Performance Analysis, Routing Protocol, Energy-efficient Wireless Network
  • methodology: The MANIAC Challenge is an NSF-funded competition to better understand cooperation and interoperability in ad hoc networks. Competing teams of students/researchers come together to form an ad hoc network. The organizers generated traffic destined to each team. Teams were judged based on how much of the traffic destined to them made it through the network, how little energy they consumed in forwarding traffic and a subjective evaluation of the quality of their solution's design. To get their traffic across the network, each team relied on other teams' willingness to forward traffic for them. We developed a software and an API to allow the teams to program their nodes and override forwarding decisions made by the routing protocol. We also developed network monitoring and management software to keep track in real-time of topology changes and traffic loads experienced by each node during the competition. In the MANIAC Challenge, traffic was sent to participant nodes from reference nodes in the network. Teams were given the tools to monitor and manipulate traffic flowing around and through them, respectively. As teams participated and forwarded, they consumed resources (lose points), but as traffic affiliated with them reached its destination, they received points. The overall goal of the competition was to have the most points at the end of the competition. More details about the MANIAC Challenge, including conference papers analyzing the data collected, can be found at www.maniacchallenge.org. The data included traces for the routing tables generated at each node for each time instant during the tests, and topology traces generated from the route logs to record topology changes at each time instant. Each of the three runs of the competition lasted around 20 minutes. A total of 16 network nodes participated in the tests with IP addresses of the form 10.10.0.x, where x (the fourth octet) is in the set {21, 22, 24, 25, 40-51}.
  • vt/maniac/2007 Traces

    • routing: The routing tables at each node that participated in each test during MANIAC 2007.
      • files: fr.10396.0.route_logs1.tar.gz, fr.10423.0.route_logs2.tar.gz, fr.10495.0.route_logs3.tar.gz
      • configuration: The routing logs contain snapshots of the routing tables at each node that participated in each test at each time instant. The routing logs for each test are collected together.
      • format: In each test, a separate file is assigned for each node (the file name includes the node number which is the 4th octet of the node's IP address, expressed in decimal). Each entry in the route logs starts with the time instant at which the routing table was generated, followed by the routing table itself, as in this example: 10:48:29 Kernel IP routing table Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use Iface 10.10.0.48 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.49 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.50 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 UH 1 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.51 10.10.0.50 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.22 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.40 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.25 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.24 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.41 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.42 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 UH 1 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.43 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 UH 1 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.46 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 UH 1 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.47 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 eth0 127.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 U 0 0 0 lo
      • note: Because the logging process was started before the competition actually started, you will find the routing logs spanning a time period larger than the actual 20 minutes of the competition runs. The topology files that were generated from these logs were adjusted to reflect the approximate start and end times of the tests.
    • topology: Trace of network topology and connectivity changed over the duration of the tests during MANIAC 2007.
    • file: fr.8376.0.topologyfiles.tar.gz
    • configuration: The topology files show how the network topology and connectivity changed over the duration of the tests.
    • format: We generated a separate topology file for each test, each providing a snapshot of the network topology at each time instant. A sample entry in a topology file is as follows: 09:51:21 21 22 24 25 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 21,1 0,0 48,4 49,3 0,0 49,3 49,3 48,2 48,3 48,2 49,2 0,1 48,2 0,1 0,1 48,2 48,3 22,1 45,3 0,0 45,2 0,0 51,2 45,2 45,2 0,1 0,1 0,1 45,2 45,2 45,2 45,3 45,2 0,1 24,1 0,0 43,2 0,0 0,0 45,2 0,1 43,2 0,1 47,2 0,1 43,2 0,1 45,2 43,2 45,2 45,3 25,1 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 40,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 41,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 42,1 0,0 0,0 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 50,2 0,1 0,1 43,1 50,2 0,1 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,1 44,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 45,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 46,1 0,1 45,2 45,2 0,0 45,2 45,2 0,1 48,3 49,2 0,1 0,0 45,2 0,1 0,1 0,1 50,2 47,1 0,0 0,0 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 42,2 0,0 0,1 50,2 0,1 0,1 48,1 0,1 45,2 45,2 0,0 51,2 45,2 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 45,2 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 49,1 0,1 45,2 45,2 0,0 45,2 45,2 48,2 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,0 0,1 50,2 50,1 0,1 45,2 45,2 0,0 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,0 0,1 51,1 48,2 0,1 45,2 0,0 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,1 45,2 48,2 0,0 An entry in a topology file starts with the time instant at which topology the snapshot was taken. A table showing the connections between each pair of nodes in the network follows, where the row represents the source node and the column represents the destination node. Column and row headers contain the node identifiers for destination and source, respectively (as before, nodes are identified by the fourth octet of their IP address, expressed in decimal). Row headers also contain a flag next to the node identifier. This flag, which can have a value of 0 or 1, indicates whether this node logged a routing table at that particular time instant. The reason we introduced this flag is to distinguish between the case of a node that logged an empty routing table (flag value of 1) and a node that did not log a routing table at all (flag value of 0) at a particular time instant, where in both cases all the entries in the row corresponding to that node will have the value of 0,0. A general entry in the table that describes the route from node x (the row) to node y (the column) is in the format (gw, hops). The first field, gw, represents the gateway that node x uses to reach node y, while the hops entry represents the number of hops in the route. An entry that has a value 0,0 indicates that node x had no route to node y at that particular time instant. An entry that has a value 0,1 indicates that node x can reach node y directly (with no gateway and in 1 hop) at that particular time instant. An entry that has a value of a,b means that node x can reach node y through gateway a and in b hops. Note that routes between nodes x and y can be asymmetric. In other words, it is not necessary that node y reaches node x using the same route that x used to reach y. You may find, in some cases, that node x could reach node y in 3 hops while node y could reach node x in 2 hops or even had no route to node x.

vt/maniac/2009

Traceset of routing and topology traces collected during MANIAC Challenge 2009.

  • description: The data comprises routing and topology traces collected during the Mobile Ad hoc Networks Interoperability And Cooperation (MANIAC) Challenge, held on March 8, 2009 in conjunction with IEEE PerCom 2009.
  • measurement purpose: Network Performance Analysis, Routing Protocol, Energy-efficient Wireless Network
  • methodology: The MANIAC Challenge is an NSF-funded competition to better understand cooperation and interoperability in ad hoc networks. Competing teams of students/researchers come together to form an ad hoc network. The organizers generated traffic destined to each team. Teams were judged based on how much of the traffic destined to them made it through the network, how little energy they consumed in forwarding traffic and a subjective evaluation of the quality of their solution's design. To get their traffic across the network, each team relied on other teams' willingness to forward traffic for them. We developed a software and an API to allow the teams to program their nodes and override forwarding decisions made by the routing protocol. We also developed network monitoring and management software to keep track in real-time of topology changes and traffic loads experienced by each node during the competition. In the MANIAC Challenge, traffic was sent to participant nodes from reference nodes in the network. Teams were given the tools to monitor and manipulate traffic flowing around and through them, respectively. As teams participated and forwarded, they consumed resources (lose points), but as traffic affiliated with them reached its destination, they received points. The overall goal of the competition was to have the most points at the end of the competition. More details about the MANIAC Challenge, including conference papers analyzing the data collected, can be found at www.maniacchallenge.org. The data included traces for the routing tables generated at each node for each time instant during the tests, and topology traces generated from the route logs to record topology changes at each time instant. Each of the three runs of the competition lasted around 20 minutes. A total of 21 network nodes participated in the tests with IP addresses of the form 10.10.0.x, where x (the fourth octet) is in the set {21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 50-65}. We did not collect the routing traces from nodes 21-25, so the topology logs will contain only inputs from the nodes 50-65.
  • vt/maniac/2009 Traces

    • routing: The routing tables at each node that participated in each test during MANIAC 2007.
      • file: route_logs.zip
      • configuration: The routing logs contain snapshots of the routing tables at each node that participated in each test at each time instant. The routing logs for each test are collected together.
      • format: In each test, a separate file is assigned for each node (the file name includes the node number which is the 4th octet of the node's IP address, expressed in decimal). Each entry in the route logs starts with the time instant at which the routing table was generated, followed by the routing table itself, as in this example: 10:48:29 Kernel IP routing table Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use Iface 10.10.0.48 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.49 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.50 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 UH 1 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.51 10.10.0.50 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.22 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.40 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.25 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.24 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.41 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.42 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 UH 1 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.43 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 UH 1 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.46 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 UH 1 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.47 10.10.0.43 255.255.255.255 UGH 2 0 0 eth0 10.10.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 eth0 127.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 U 0 0 0 lo
      • note: Because the logging process was started before the competition actually started, you will find the routing logs spanning a time period larger than the actual 20 minutes of the competition runs. The topology files that were generated from these logs were adjusted to reflect the approximate start and end times of the tests.
    • topology: Trace of network topology and connectivity changed over the duration of the tests during MANIAC 2009.
      • file: topology_files.tar.gz
      • configuration: The topology files show how the network topology and connectivity changed over the duration of the tests.
      • format: We generated a separate topology file for each test, each providing a snapshot of the network topology at each time instant. A sample entry in a topology file is as follows: 09:51:21 21 22 24 25 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 21,1 0,0 48,4 49,3 0,0 49,3 49,3 48,2 48,3 48,2 49,2 0,1 48,2 0,1 0,1 48,2 48,3 22,1 45,3 0,0 45,2 0,0 51,2 45,2 45,2 0,1 0,1 0,1 45,2 45,2 45,2 45,3 45,2 0,1 24,1 0,0 43,2 0,0 0,0 45,2 0,1 43,2 0,1 47,2 0,1 43,2 0,1 45,2 43,2 45,2 45,3 25,1 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 40,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 41,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 42,1 0,0 0,0 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 50,2 0,1 0,1 43,1 50,2 0,1 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,1 44,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 45,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0 46,1 0,1 45,2 45,2 0,0 45,2 45,2 0,1 48,3 49,2 0,1 0,0 45,2 0,1 0,1 0,1 50,2 47,1 0,0 0,0 0,1 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 42,2 0,0 0,1 50,2 0,1 0,1 48,1 0,1 45,2 45,2 0,0 51,2 45,2 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 45,2 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 49,1 0,1 45,2 45,2 0,0 45,2 45,2 48,2 0,0 0,1 0,1 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,0 0,1 50,2 50,1 0,1 45,2 45,2 0,0 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,0 0,1 51,1 48,2 0,1 45,2 0,0 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,1 0,1 0,1 45,2 0,1 0,1 45,2 48,2 0,0 An entry in a topology file starts with the time instant at which topology the snapshot was taken. A table showing the connections between each pair of nodes in the network follows, where the row represents the source node and the column represents the destination node. Column and row headers contain the node identifiers for destination and source, respectively (as before, nodes are identified by the fourth octet of their IP address, expressed in decimal). Row headers also contain a flag next to the node identifier. This flag, which can have a value of 0 or 1, indicates whether this node logged a routing table at that particular time instant. The reason we introduced this flag is to distinguish between the case of a node that logged an empty routing table (flag value of 1) and a node that did not log a routing table at all (flag value of 0) at a particular time instant, where in both cases all the entries in the row corresponding to that node will have the value of 0,0. A general entry in the table that describes the route from node x (the row) to node y (the column) is in the format (gw, hops). The first field, gw, represents the gateway that node x uses to reach node y, while the hops entry represents the number of hops in the route. An entry that has a value 0,0 indicates that node x had no route to node y at that particular time instant. An entry that has a value 0,1 indicates that node x can reach node y directly (with no gateway and in 1 hop) at that particular time instant. An entry that has a value of a,b means that node x can reach node y through gateway a and in b hops. Note that routes between nodes x and y can be asymmetric. In other words, it is not necessary that node y reaches node x using the same route that x used to reach y. You may find, in some cases, that node x could reach node y in 3 hops while node y could reach node x in 2 hops or even had no route to node x.
Instructions: 

The files in this directory are a CRAWDAD dataset hosted by IEEE-Dataport. 

About CRAWDAD: the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data At Dartmouth is a data resource for the research community interested in wireless networks and mobile computing. 

CRAWDAD was founded at Dartmouth College in 2004, led by Tristan Henderson, David Kotz, and Chris McDonald. CRAWDAD datasets are hosted by IEEE-Dataport as of November 2022. 

Note: Please use the Data in an ethical and responsible way with the aim of doing no harm to any person or entity for the benefit of society at large. Please respect the privacy of any human subjects whose wireless-network activity is captured by the Data and comply with all laws applicable, including without limitation such applicable laws pertaining to the protection of personal information, security of data, and data breaches. Please do not apply, adapt or develop algorithms for the extraction of the true identity of users and other information of a personal nature, which might constitute personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws. Do not publish or otherwise disclose to any other person or entity any information that constitutes personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws derived from the Data through manual or automated techniques. 

Please acknowledge the source of the Data in any publications or presentations reporting using the specific citation information for each set of Data. 

Citation:

You can use this DOI and text to cite (bibtext):  Amr Hilal, Jawwad N Chattha, Vivek Srivastava, Michael S Thompson, Allen B MacKenzie, Luiz A DaSilva, Pallavi Saraswati, vt/maniac, https://doi.org/10.15783/C7WG6T , Date: 20110721

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These datasets are part of Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data (CRAWDAD). CRAWDAD began in 2004 at Dartmouth College as a place to share wireless network data with the research community. Its purpose was to enable access to data from real networks and real mobile users at a time when collecting such data was challenging and expensive. The archive has continued to grow since its inception, and starting in summer 2022 is being housed on IEEE DataPort.

Questions about CRAWDAD? See our CRAWDAD FAQ. Interested in submitting your dataset to the CRAWDAD collection? Get started, by submitting an Open Access Dataset.