CRAWDAD uportorwthaachen/vanetjamming2014

Citation Author(s):
Oscar
Puñal
Carlos
Pereira
Ana
Aguiar
James
Gross
Submitted by:
CRAWDAD Team
Last updated:
Mon, 05/12/2014 - 08:00
DOI:
10.15783/C7Q306
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Abstract 

This dataset contains traces of 802.11p packets, collected in a rural area located in the periphery of Aachen (Germany) in 2012, with the presence of an RF jamming signal with constant, periodic, and reactive jamming patterns.

This dataset contains several tracesets of 802.11p communications with the presence of an RF jamming signal. The RF jammer has different patterns of operation, namely constant, periodic, and reactive jamming. The observations were performed in a rural area located in the periphery of Aachen in Germany.

date/time of measurement start: 2012-08-15

date/time of measurement end: 2012-08-23

collection environment: For the outdoor measurements, we carried out experiments in a rural area located in the periphery of Aachen in Germany. The area has two perpedicular roads. A main road that has a length of 600 m and a 120 m long side road. The line-of-sight along the main road (about 300 m) is shorter than its total length due to a slight descending slope of that road. Furthermore, the area between main road and side road exhibits a slight elevation of the ground that can block line-of-sight along the diagonal path between both roads. The amount of traffic in the area is negligible with only few sporadic cars. This open space scenario offers a low dispersive propagation environment, as there are no obstacles or buildings between or surrounding the vehicles.

network configuration: For the measurements, we used the Wireless Open-Access Research Platform (WARP) boards for implementing the jammer. The WARP boards provide an 802.11-like OFDM design on FPGA and a 10MHz bandwidth 802.11a/g RF transceiver, which allows transmission at frequencies up to 5.875 GHz, hence, covering 802.11p channels 172 and 174. 

For both the transmitter and receiver, we used NEC Linkbird 802.11p connected to a laptop Asus Eee PC running a java application to generate traffic (transmitter) and to retrieve information from the packets received at the linkbird (receiver). All reported measurements were carried out at 5.86 GHz, which corresponds to the lowest channel (Ch.172) of the frequency band allocated to 802.11p communications and is meant for public safety communications. The omni-directional antennae used in our measurements are designed to work at the 5.0-6.0 GHz band and yield a 6 dBi gain. 

In every experiment, the transmitter sends packets with 17.48 dBm of transmit power, at a data rate of 6 Mbps (QPSK 1/2), payload length of 100 Byte and at 100 packets per second.

The signal from every jamming profile has 16.75 dBm. The constant jamming signal is characterized by a 2.71 ms ON phase and a 10 microseconds OFF phase. The periodic jamming signal is characterized by a 64 microseconds ON phase and a 10 microseconds OFF phase. 

The reactive jamming (12 microseconds, 500 microseconds) profile has an energy detection threshold of -75 dBm, a reaction delay of 12 microseconds, and lasts for 500 microseconds. The reactive jamming (40 microseconds, 500 microseconds) profile has an energy detection threshold of -75 dBm, a reaction delay of 40 microseconds, and lasts for 500 microseconds.

data collection methodology: Log files from a java application was used along with the traces generated by the two linkbirds, plus the gps readings, assess the impact of the jammer.

Tracesets

movement

Traceset collected in an open field rural area located in the periphery of Aachen in Germany. The area has two perpedicular roads, a main road that has a length of 600 m and a 120 m long side road. We used different RF jamming profiles and different distances between nodes for the measurements.

  • files: uportorwthaachen-vanetjamming2014.tar.gz, reactive_12_500.tar.gz, reactive_40_500.tar.gz
  • methodology: We place the jammer at the end of the side street and the transmitter at the crossroad. The receiver moves along the main road, which results in varying SINR values. The transmitter sends packets to the receiver at a rate of 100 packets per second. This procedure is repeated for reactive jamming (12 microseconds, 500 microseconds) and reactive jamming (40 microseconds, 500 microseconds) profiles. 
  • format: trace.txt is a text file generated from the linkbird the contact where a certain device is seen with the timestamp information, from where the packet is from, the type and size of packet. java.txt is a text file generated from java application running in the laptops. It gathers the following information (gps information only for outdoors):

    -nodeid: node identifier

    -systime: system time

    -gpstime: gps time

    -type: message type

    -mid: message identifier

    -psize: packet size

    -mylat: node latitude

    -mylong: node longitude

    -myalt: node altitude

    -myheading: node heading

    -myspeed: node speed

    -srcnodeid: identifier of the message sender

    -srclat: latitude of the message sender

    -srclong: longitude of the message sender

    -srcalt: altitude of the message sender

    -srchead: heading of the message sender

    -srcspeed: speed of the message sender

    -srcgpstime: gps time of the message sender

    -dist: distance between sender and receiver

 

movement traces

  • reactive_12_500: Trace collected in an open field. Jammer was placed at the end of the side street and the transmitter at the crossroad. The receiver moves along the main road, which results in varying SINR values. The transmitter sends packets to the receiver at a rate of 100 packets per second. This trace contains the measurements for the reactive jamming (12 microseconds, 500 microseconds) profile.
    • configuration: For this measurement, jammer, transmitter and receiver were placed inside standard vehicles and their antennas were located in the middle of the roof of each vehicle. Jammer was placed at the end of the side street and the transmitter at the crossroad. The receiver moves along the main road at approx. 20-25 km/h. The experiment was performed for reactive jamming (12 microseconds, 500 microseconds) profile.
  • reactive_40_500: Trace collected in an open field. Jammer was placed at the end of the side street and the transmitter at the crossroad. The receiver moves along the main road, which results in varying SINR values. The transmitter sends packets to the receiver at a rate of 100 packets per second. This trace contains the measurements for the reactive jamming (40 microseconds, 500 microseconds) profile.
    • configuration: For this measurement, jammer, transmitter and receiver were placed inside standard vehicles and their antennas were located in the middle of the roof of each vehicle. Jammer was placed at the end of the side street and the transmitter at the crossroad. The receiver moves along the main road at approx. 20-25 km/h. The experiment was performed for reactive jamming (40 microseconds, 500 microseconds) profile.

static

Traceset collected in an open field rural area located in the periphery of Aachen in Germany. The area has two perpedicular roads, a main road that has a length of 600 m and a 120 m long side road. We used different RF jamming profiles, distances between nodes, effective output power of the jammer for the measurements.

  • files: constant_vary_jammer_att.tar.gz, constant_vary_tx_rx_distance.tar.gz, periodic_vary_jammer_att.tar.gz
  • methodology: We place the jammer at the end of the side street and the transmitter at the crossroad. The receiver is placed at different positions along the main road. The different node configurations result in varying SINR values. For every receiver position, the transmitter sends packets to the receiver at a rate of 100 packets per second over 2 minutes. This procedure is repeated for a representative subset of the available jamming patterns, namely constant and periodic. We additionaly reduced the effective output power of the jammer by adding attenuators between the RF output of the WARP board and the antenna to obtain further different values of average SNIR at the receiver.
  • format: trace.txt is a text file generated from the linkbird the contact where a certain device is seen with the timestamp information, from where the packet is from, the type and size of packet. java.txt is a text file generated from java application running in the laptops. It gathers the following information (gps information only for outdoors):

    -nodeid: node identifier

    -systime: system time

    -gpstime: gps time

    -type: message type

    -mid: message identifier

    -psize: packet size

    -mylat: node latitude

    -mylong: node longitude

    -myalt: node altitude

    -myheading: node heading

    -myspeed: node speed

    -srcnodeid: identifier of the message sender

    -srclat: latitude of the message sender

    -srclong: longitude of the message sender

    -srcalt: altitude of the message sender

    -srchead: heading of the message sender

    -srcspeed: speed of the message sender

    -srcgpstime: gps time of the message sender

    -dist: distance between sender and receiver

  • constant_vary_jammer_att: Trace collected in an open field. Jammer was placed at the end of the side street and the transmitter at the crossroad. The receiver is near the transmitter, at approximately 4 meters. The transmitter sends packets to the receiver at a rate of 100 packets per second. This trace contains the measurements for the constant jamming profile. We reduced the effective output power of the jammer by adding attenuators between the RF output of the WARP board and the antenna to obtain different values of average SNIR at the receiver.
    • configuration: For this measurement, jammer, transmitter and receiver were placed inside standard vehicles and their antennas were located in the middle of the roof of each vehicle. Jammer was placed at the end of the side street and both the transmitter and receiver are at the crossroad. The experiment was performed for the constant jamming profile, where we used different attenuators between the RF output of the WARP board and the antenna of the jammer.
  • constant_vary_tx_rx_distance: Trace collected in an open field. Jammer was placed at the end of the side street and the transmitter at the crossroad. The receiver is placed at different positions along the main road. The transmitter sends packets to the receiver at a rate of 100 packets per second. This trace contains the measurements for the constant jamming profile. We place the receiver at different positions to obtain different values of average SNIR at the receiver. The effective output power of the jammer is reduced by 6 dB.
    • configuration: For this measurement, jammer, transmitter and receiver were placed inside standard vehicles and their antennas were located in the middle of the roof of each vehicle. Jammer was placed at the end of the side street and the transmitter is at the crossroad. The receiver is placed at different positions along the main road to obtain different values of average SNIR at the receiver. The experiment was performed for the constant jamming profile. The effective output power of the jammer is reduced by 6 dB.
  • periodic_vary_jammer_att: Trace collected in an open field. Jammer was placed at the end of the side street and the transmitter at the crossroad. The receiver is near the transmitter, at approximately 4 meters. The transmitter sends packets to the receiver at a rate of 100 packets per second. This trace contains the measurements for the periodic jamming profile. We reduced the effective output power of the jammer by adding attenuators between the RF output of the WARP board and the antenna to obtain different values of average SNIR at the receiver.
    • configuration: For this measurement, jammer, transmitter and receiver were placed inside standard vehicles and their antennas were located in the middle of the roof of each vehicle. Jammer was placed at the end of the side street and both the transmitter and receiver are at the crossroad. The experiment was performed for the periodic jamming profile, where we used different attenuators between the RF output of the WARP board and the antenna of the jammer.
Instructions: 

The files in this directory are a CRAWDAD dataset hosted by IEEE-Dataport. 

About CRAWDAD: the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data At Dartmouth is a data resource for the research community interested in wireless networks and mobile computing. 

CRAWDAD was founded at Dartmouth College in 2004, led by Tristan Henderson, David Kotz, and Chris McDonald. CRAWDAD datasets are hosted by IEEE-Dataport as of November 2022. 

Note: Please use the Data in an ethical and responsible way with the aim of doing no harm to any person or entity for the benefit of society at large. Please respect the privacy of any human subjects whose wireless-network activity is captured by the Data and comply with all laws applicable, including without limitation such applicable laws pertaining to the protection of personal information, security of data, and data breaches. Please do not apply, adapt or develop algorithms for the extraction of the true identity of users and other information of a personal nature, which might constitute personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws. Do not publish or otherwise disclose to any other person or entity any information that constitutes personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws derived from the Data through manual or automated techniques. 

Please acknowledge the source of the Data in any publications or presentations reporting using the specific citation information for each set of Data. 

Citation:

You can use this DOI and text to cite (bibtext):  Oscar Puñal, Carlos Pereira, Ana Aguiar, James Gross, uportorwthaachen/vanetjamming2014, https://doi.org/10.15783/C7Q306, Date: 20140512

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