CRAWDAD ucsb/meshnet

Citation Author(s):
Irfan
Sheriff
Google
Elizabeth
Belding
Kevin C.
Almeroth
Krishna N.
Ramachandran
Submitted by:
CRAWDAD Team
Last updated:
Thu, 02/15/2007 - 08:00
DOI:
10.15783/C7WS3S
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Abstract 

Detailed link quality information was collected over several days from the UCSB MeshNet for characterizing routing stability in wireless mesh networks.

last modified : 2007-02-15

release date : 2007-02-01

date/time of measurement start : 2006-04-01

date/time of measurement end : 2006-04-07

collection environment : Considerable research has focused on the design of routing protocols for wireless mesh networks. Yet, little is understood about the stability of routes in such networks. This understanding is important in the design of wireless routing protocols, and in network planning and management. To characterize routing stability in wireless mesh networks, we use detailed link quality information collected over several days from the UCSB MeshNet. Using this information, we investigate routing stability in terms of route-level characteristics, such as prevalence, persistence and flapping. You can find our key findings in our paper [ramachandran-mesh].

network configuration : The UCSB MeshNet is a multi-radio 802.11a/b network consisting of 20 PC-nodes deployed indoors on five floors of a typical of office building in the UCSB campus. Each node is equipped with two types of PCMCIA radios: a Winstron Atheros-chipset 802.11a radio and a Senao Prism2-chipset 802.11b radio. Each type of radio operates on a bandspecific common channel. For rate adaptation, the 802.11b and 802.11a radios use autorate feedback and SampleRate respectively. There are 802.11b access points deployed in the building, which operate on various 802.11b channels. There is no external interference in the 802.11a band.

data collection methodology : Link quality is measured using the Expected Transmission Time (ETT) metric, which estimates the total time to transmit a packet on a link. The ETT is calculated from a link's loss rate and its data rate. ETT is given by the equation: [(packetsize)/(d1*d2*bw)], where d1 and d2 are the link's delivery ratios in the forward and reverse directions, and bw is the average of the link data rate reported by the two end nodes on the link. packetsize is assumed to be 1500 bytes.

Traceset

ucsb/meshnet/neighbortable

Traceset for detailed link quality information collected over several days from the UCSB MeshNet.

  • files: 1143927049-1143953729.tar.gz, 1144373273-1144393193.tar.gz, 1144393236-1144450070.tar.gz
  • description: Detailed link quality information was collected over several days from the UCSB MeshNet for characterizing routing stability in wireless mesh networks.
  • measurement purpose: Routing Protocol
  • methodology: Link quality is measured using the Expected Transmission Time (ETT) metric, which estimates the total time to transmit a packet on a link. The ETT is calculated from a link's loss rate and its data rate. ETT is given by the equation: [(packetsize)/(d1*d2*bw)], where d1 and d2 are the link's delivery ratios in the forward and reverse directions, and bw is the average of the link data rate reported by the two end nodes on the link. packetsize is assumed to be 1500 bytes. Link quality information was collected on three different days. The loss rate was calculated by having each node issue a broadcast probe of size 524 bytes every second on each of its radios. Each node records the number of probes received from each of its neighbors in a 10 second window. The ratio of the number of packets received to the number of packets sent (10) yields a link's delivery ratio. The link data rate is measured using packet pair probing. Every 10 seconds, each node issues packet-pair unicast probes of size 134 bytes and 1134 bytes on each of its radios. The difference in transmission time of the packet pair, as measured by a neighbor, is piggybacked on packet pairs issued by that neighbor. Every 10 seconds, each node reports each of its link's delivery ratio and data rate to a central repository.

ucsb/meshnet/neighbortable Traces

  • 20060401: Trace for the ETT (Expected Transmission Time) values of neighbor nodes collected from the UCSB MeshNet.
    • configuration: This trace is provided for each minute between the times indicated in the filename. For each minute, the neighbortable indicates the neighbors of each radio in the testbed along with each neighbor's ETT (the Expected Transmission Time) value. ETT is the estimated time to transmit a packet on a link to a neighbor. Following are the IP addresses of nodes in the UCSB MeshNet that participated in the experiment. # format: hostname (IP mode)+ # mode can be 0 - triband, 1 - 802.11a, 2 - 802.11b, 3 - 802.11g h1151 10.1.1.2 2 10.2.1.2 1 h2113 10.1.1.21 2 10.2.1.21 1 h2116 10.1.1.4 2 10.2.1.4 1 h2120 10.1.1.3 2 10.2.1.3 1 h2121 10.1.1.5 2 10.2.1.5 1 h2151 10.1.1.60 2 10.2.1.60 1 h2164 10.1.1.7 2 10.2.1.7 1 h3115 10.1.1.8 2 10.2.1.8 1 h3123 10.1.1.25 2 10.2.1.25 1 h3155 10.1.1.9 2 10.2.1.9 1 h4123 10.1.1.20 2 10.2.1.20 1 h5119 10.1.1.27 2 10.2.1.27 1 hmobile 10.1.1.109 2 10.2.1.109 1 mobile0 10.1.1.100 2 10.2.1.100 1 mobile1 10.1.1.101 2 10.2.1.101 1 mobile2 10.1.1.102 2 10.2.1.102 1 mobile3 10.1.1.103 2 10.2.1.103 1 mobile5 10.1.1.105 2 10.2.1.105 1 mobile6 10.1.1.106 2 10.2.1.106 1
    • format:

      1. Directory and files

      In the trace directory, you can find

      - neighbortable-[t]: a neighbor table collected at time t (in unix time stamp) for one minute.

      - utot: a Perl script that is a handy tool to convert a unix time stamp to human readable time.

      An example invocation is utot 1143927049, which yields Sat Apr 1 13:30:49 2006.

       

      2. File format

      Each neighbor table file consists of lines in the following format:

      ip_address (neighbor_ip ETT)+

      where

      - ip_address: the ip address of a given node.

      - (neighbor_ip ETT): a pair of the ip address of one of the neighbor nodes and the ETT (the Expected Transmission Time) from the given node to the neighbor.

      3. Sample data in neighbor table

      10.1.1.2 10.1.1.106 3.3693178 10.1.1.60 0.7227173 10.1.1.9 0.71176344 10.1.1.100 0.88054603 10.1.1.25 7.0004735 10.1.1.103 7.473756

      10.2.1.2 10.2.1.60 0.31935605 10.2.1.100 72.754555

      10.1.1.60 10.1.1.102 7.978693 10.1.1.2 0.7227173 10.1.1.106 1.1479675 10.1.1.7 10.409893 10.1.1.100 0.37388054 10.1.1.3 1.9975551 10.1.1.25 0.92662233 10.1.1.1

  • 20060406: Trace for the ETT (Expected Transmission Time) values of neighbor nodes collected from the UCSB MeshNet.
    • configuration: This trace is provided for each minute between the times indicated in the filename. For each minute, the neighbortable indicates the neighbors of each radio in the testbed along with each neighbor's ETT value. ETT is the estimated time to transmit a packet on a link to a neighbor. Following are the IP addresses of nodes in the UCSB MeshNet that participated in the experiment. # format: hostname (IP mode)+ # mode can be 0 - triband, 1 - 802.11a, 2 - 802.11b, 3 - 802.11g h1151 10.1.1.2 2 10.2.1.2 1 h2113 10.1.1.21 2 10.2.1.21 1 h2116 10.1.1.4 2 10.2.1.4 1 h2120 10.1.1.3 2 10.2.1.3 1 h2121 10.1.1.5 2 10.2.1.5 1 h2151 10.1.1.60 2 10.2.1.60 1 h2164 10.1.1.7 2 10.2.1.7 1 h3115 10.1.1.8 2 10.2.1.8 1 h3123 10.1.1.25 2 10.2.1.25 1 h3155 10.1.1.9 2 10.2.1.9 1 h4123 10.1.1.20 2 10.2.1.20 1 h5119 10.1.1.27 2 10.2.1.27 1 hmobile 10.1.1.109 2 10.2.1.109 1 mobile0 10.1.1.100 2 10.2.1.100 1 mobile1 10.1.1.101 2 10.2.1.101 1 mobile2 10.1.1.102 2 10.2.1.102 1 mobile3 10.1.1.103 2 10.2.1.103 1 mobile5 10.1.1.105 2 10.2.1.105 1 mobile6 10.1.1.106 2 10.2.1.106 1
    • format:

      1. Directory and files

      In the trace directory, you can find

      - neighbortable-[t]: a neighbor table collected at time t (in unix time stamp) for one minute.

      - utot: a Perl script that is a handy tool to convert a unix time stamp to human readable time.

      An example invocation is utot 1143927049, which yields Sat Apr 1 13:30:49 2006.

       

      2. File format

      Each neighbor table file consists of lines in the following format:

      ip_address (neighbor_ip ETT)+

      where

      - ip_address: the ip address of a given node.

      - (neighbor_ip ETT): a pair of the ip address of one of the neighbor nodes and the ETT (the Expected Transmission Time) from the given node to the neighbor.

      3. Sample data in neighbor table

      10.1.1.2 10.1.1.106 3.3693178 10.1.1.60 0.7227173 10.1.1.9 0.71176344 10.1.1.100 0.88054603 10.1.1.25 7.0004735 10.1.1.103 7.473756

      10.2.1.2 10.2.1.60 0.31935605 10.2.1.100 72.754555

      10.1.1.60 10.1.1.102 7.978693 10.1.1.2 0.7227173 10.1.1.106 1.1479675 10.1.1.7 10.409893 10.1.1.100 0.37388054 10.1.1.3 1.9975551 10.1.1.25 0.92662233 10.1.1.1

  • 20060407: Trace for the ETT (Expected Transmission Time) values of neighbor nodes collected from the UCSB MeshNet.
    • configuration: This trace is provided for each minute between the times indicated in the filename. For each minute, the neighbortable indicates the neighbors of each radio in the testbed along with each neighbor's ETT value. ETT is the estimated time to transmit a packet on a link to a neighbor. Following are the IP addresses of nodes in the UCSB MeshNet that participated in the experiment. # format: hostname (IP mode)+ # mode can be 0 - triband, 1 - 802.11a, 2 - 802.11b, 3 - 802.11g h1151 10.1.1.2 2 10.2.1.2 1 h2113 10.1.1.21 2 10.2.1.21 1 h2116 10.1.1.4 2 10.2.1.4 1 h2120 10.1.1.3 2 10.2.1.3 1 h2121 10.1.1.5 2 10.2.1.5 1 h2151 10.1.1.60 2 10.2.1.60 1 h2164 10.1.1.7 2 10.2.1.7 1 h3115 10.1.1.8 2 10.2.1.8 1 h3123 10.1.1.25 2 10.2.1.25 1 h3155 10.1.1.9 2 10.2.1.9 1 h4123 10.1.1.20 2 10.2.1.20 1 h5119 10.1.1.27 2 10.2.1.27 1 hmobile 10.1.1.109 2 10.2.1.109 1 mobile0 10.1.1.100 2 10.2.1.100 1 mobile1 10.1.1.101 2 10.2.1.101 1 mobile2 10.1.1.102 2 10.2.1.102 1 mobile3 10.1.1.103 2 10.2.1.103 1 mobile5 10.1.1.105 2 10.2.1.105 1 mobile6 10.1.1.106 2 10.2.1.106 1
    • format:

      1. Directory and files

      In the trace directory, you can find

      - neighbortable-[t]: a neighbor table collected at time t (in unix time stamp) for one minute.

      - utot: a Perl script that is a handy tool to convert a unix time stamp to human readable time.

      An example invocation is utot 1143927049, which yields Sat Apr 1 13:30:49 2006.

       

      2. File format

      Each neighbor table file consists of lines in the following format:

      ip_address (neighbor_ip ETT)+

      where

      - ip_address: the ip address of a given node.

      - (neighbor_ip ETT): a pair of the ip address of one of the neighbor nodes and the ETT (the Expected Transmission Time) from the given node to the neighbor.

      3. Sample data in neighbor table

      10.1.1.2 10.1.1.106 3.3693178 10.1.1.60 0.7227173 10.1.1.9 0.71176344 10.1.1.100 0.88054603 10.1.1.25 7.0004735 10.1.1.103 7.473756

      10.2.1.2 10.2.1.60 0.31935605 10.2.1.100 72.754555

      10.1.1.60 10.1.1.102 7.978693 10.1.1.2 0.7227173 10.1.1.106 1.1479675 10.1.1.7 10.409893 10.1.1.100 0.37388054 10.1.1.3 1.9975551 10.1.1.25 0.92662233 10.1.1.1

Instructions: 

The files in this directory are a CRAWDAD dataset hosted by IEEE DataPort. 

About CRAWDAD: the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data At Dartmouth is a data resource for the research community interested in wireless networks and mobile computing. 

CRAWDAD was founded at Dartmouth College in 2004, led by Tristan Henderson, David Kotz, and Chris McDonald. CRAWDAD datasets are hosted by IEEE DataPort as of November 2022. 

Note: Please use the Data in an ethical and responsible way with the aim of doing no harm to any person or entity for the benefit of society at large. Please respect the privacy of any human subjects whose wireless-network activity is captured by the Data and comply with all applicable laws, including without limitation such applicable laws pertaining to the protection of personal information, security of data, and data breaches. Please do not apply, adapt or develop algorithms for the extraction of the true identity of users and other information of a personal nature, which might constitute personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws. Do not publish or otherwise disclose to any other person or entity any information that constitutes personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws derived from the Data through manual or automated techniques. 

Please acknowledge the source of the Data in any publications or presentations reporting use of this Data. 

Citation:

Irfan Sheriff,  Elizabeth Belding, Kevin C. Almeroth, Krishna N. Ramachandran, ucsb/meshnet, https://doi.org/10.15783/C7WS3S , Date: 20070201

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These datasets are part of Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data (CRAWDAD). CRAWDAD began in 2004 at Dartmouth College as a place to share wireless network data with the research community. Its purpose was to enable access to data from real networks and real mobile users at a time when collecting such data was challenging and expensive. The archive has continued to grow since its inception, and starting in summer 2022 is being housed on IEEE DataPort.

Questions about CRAWDAD? See our CRAWDAD FAQ. Interested in submitting your dataset to the CRAWDAD collection? Get started, by submitting an Open Access Dataset.