CRAWDAD rice/ad_hoc_city

Citation Author(s):
Jorjeta G.
Jetcheva
Carnegie Mellon University
Yih-Chun
Hu
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Santashil
PalChaudhuri
Amit Kumar
Saha
David B.
Johnson
Rice University
Submitted by:
CRAWDAD Team
Last updated:
Sun, 07/23/2023 - 08:00
DOI:
10.15783/C73K5B
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Abstract 

Dataset of the movement of the fleet of city buses in Seattle.

We acquired several weeklong traces of the movement of the fleet of city buses in Seattle, Washington, on their normal routes providing passenger bus service throughout the city. 

date/time of measurement start: 2001-10-30

date/time of measurement end: 2001-12-02

collection environment: We propose a system, called Ad Hoc City, that is a multitier wireless ad hoc network routing architecture for generalpurpose wide-area  communication.  To evaluate our proposed design through simulation, we collected traces of the actual movement of the fleet of city buses in the Seattle, Washington metropolitan area, on their normal routes providing passenger bus service throughout the city.

Seattle provides a topographically challenging routing environment, created by a 35 square mile lake in the middle of the city. The bus system is composed of over 1200  vehicles covering a 5100 square kilometer area.

network configuration: An Automated Vehicle Location (AVL) system tracks each bus using a combination of odometry and signpost transmitters. Internet users can monitor the location of each bus in real-time using the Busview software.

data collection methodology: We acquired several weeklong traces of the movement of the fleet of city buses in Seattle, Washington, on their normal routes providing passenger bus service throughout the city.

Traceset

rice/ad_hoc_city/bus_mobility

Traceset of the movement of the fleet of city buses in Seattle.

  • file: traces.tar.gz
  • description: This traceset consists of several weeklong traces of the movement of the fleet of city buses in Seattle, Washington.
  • measurement purpose: User Mobility Characterization, Routing Protocol
  • methodology: To evaluate the Ad Hoc City architecture, we used traces of the actual movement of buses in the Seattle, Washington area King County Metro bus system. We chose the King County bus system because the data was available on-line, and because bus movement patterns closely match other vehicular traffic patterns. An Automated Vehicle Location (AVL) system tracks each bus using a combination of odometry and signpost transmitters. Internet users can monitor the location of each bus in real-time using the Busview software. We developed mechanisms for recording the data being delivered to Busview clients, and for converting the recorded data into movement patterns suitable for use in the ns-2 network simulator, which we use to evaluate our system.

rice/ad_hoc_city/bus_mobility Trace

  • Trace1 Trace of the movement of the fleet of city buses in Seattle.
    • configuration: The traces are based on location update messages sent by each bus.
    • format: The traces in Trace1 directory correspond to several weeks worth of data. Each line in the traces is formatted as follows: day-month:time; bus_id; route_id; unknown; x_coord; y_coord. The route_id signifies the route followed by a bus. Multiple buses may follow a given bus route at any time. The x and y coordinates are in feet and were computed from the latitude and longitude values reported in the raw traces.
  • Trace2 Trace of the movement of the fleet of city buses in Seattle.
    • configuration: The traces are based on location update messages sent by each bus.
    • format: The traces in Trace2 directory correspond to several weeks worth of data. Each line in the traces is formatted as follows: day-month:time; bus_id; route_id; unknown; x_coord; y_coord. The route_id signifies the route followed by a bus. Multiple buses may follow a given bus route at any time. The x and y coordinates are in feet and were computed from the latitude and longitude values reported in the raw traces.
  • Trace3 Trace of the movement of the fleet of city buses in Seattle.
    • configuration: The traces are based on location update messages sent by each bus.
    • format: The traces in Trace3 directory correspond to several weeks worth of data. Each line in the traces is formatted as follows: day-month:time; bus_id; route_id; unknown; x_coord; y_coord. The route_id signifies the route followed by a bus. Multiple buses may follow a given bus route at any time. The x and y coordinates are in feet and were computed from the latitude and longitude values reported in the raw traces.
  • Trace4 Trace of the movement of the fleet of city buses in Seattle.
    • configuration: The traces are based on location update messages sent by each bus.
    • format: The traces in Trace4 directory correspond to several weeks worth of data. Each line in the traces is formatted as follows: day-month:time; bus_id; route_id; unknown; x_coord; y_coord. The route_id signifies the route followed by a bus. Multiple buses may follow a given bus route at any time. The x and y coordinates are in feet and were computed from the latitude and longitude values reported in the raw traces.
  • Trace5 Trace of the movement of the fleet of city buses in Seattle.
    • configuration: The traces are based on location update messages sent by each bus.
    • format: The traces in Trace5 directory correspond to several weeks worth of data. Each line in the traces is formatted as follows: day-month:time; bus_id; route_id; unknown; x_coord; y_coord. The route_id signifies the route followed by a bus. Multiple buses may follow a given bus route at any time. The x and y coordinates are in feet and were computed from the latitude and longitude values reported in the raw traces.
 
Instructions: 

The files in this directory are a CRAWDAD dataset hosted by IEEE DataPort. 

About CRAWDAD: the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data At Dartmouth is a data resource for the research community interested in wireless networks and mobile computing. 

CRAWDAD was founded at Dartmouth College in 2004, led by Tristan Henderson, David Kotz, and Chris McDonald. CRAWDAD datasets are hosted by IEEE DataPort as of November 2022. 

Note: Please use the Data in an ethical and responsible way with the aim of doing no harm to any person or entity for the benefit of society at large. Please respect the privacy of any human subjects whose wireless-network activity is captured by the Data and comply with all applicable laws, including without limitation such applicable laws pertaining to the protection of personal information, security of data, and data breaches. Please do not apply, adapt or develop algorithms for the extraction of the true identity of users and other information of a personal nature, which might constitute personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws. Do not publish or otherwise disclose to any other person or entity any information that constitutes personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws derived from the Data through manual or automated techniques. 

Please acknowledge the source of the Data in any publications or presentations reporting use of this Data. 

Citation:

Jorjeta G. Jetcheva, Yih-Chun Hu, Santashil PalChaudhuri, Amit Kumar Saha, David B. Johnson, rice/ad_hoc_city, https://doi.org/10.15783/C73K5B , Date: 20030911

Dataset Files

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Documentation

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File rice-ad_hoc_city-readme.txt1.63 KB

These datasets are part of Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data (CRAWDAD). CRAWDAD began in 2004 at Dartmouth College as a place to share wireless network data with the research community. Its purpose was to enable access to data from real networks and real mobile users at a time when collecting such data was challenging and expensive. The archive has continued to grow since its inception, and starting in summer 2022 is being housed on IEEE DataPort.

Questions about CRAWDAD? See our CRAWDAD FAQ. Interested in submitting your dataset to the CRAWDAD collection? Get started, by submitting an Open Access Dataset.