CRAWDAD niit/bit_errors

Citation Author(s):
Adnan
Iqbal
NUST Institute of I.T. Rawalpindi
Khurram
Shahzad
NUST Institute of I.T. Rawalpindi
Syed Ali
Khayam
NUST Institute of I.T. Rawalpindi
Yongju
Cho
Michigan State University (MSU)
Submitted by:
CRAWDAD Team
Last updated:
Tue, 09/09/2008 - 08:00
DOI:
10.15783/C7S88K
License:
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Abstract 

We collected 802.15.4 traces at NUST school of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, and collected 802.11b traces at Wireless and Video (WAVES) Lab at Michigan State University (MSU), USA, to investigate biterror process of the 802.15.4 and 802.11 networks.

last modified :

2008-09-09

release date :

2008-07-08

date/time of measurement start :

2006-06-01

date/time of measurement end :

2007-06-30

collection environment :

To investigate biterror process of 802.15.4 low data rate networks 
and 802.11b networks, we collected 802.15.4 traces at NUST School of 
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Rawalpindi, and collected 
802.11b traces at Wireless and Video (WAVES) Lab at Michigan State University (MSU),
respectively.

network configuration :

The 802.15.4 traffic was generated by programmed MicaZ motes.
To program MicaZ motes the Crossbow MIB510 Serial Programming board 
and Crossbow MIB600 Ethernet Programming board were used. 

The 802.11b network was configured in infrastructure mode and 
clients were Linux boxes using DLink DWL-650 wireless PC-Cards 
with prism2 device drivers.

data collection methodology :

To collect residual bit-error traces on an 802.15.4 network, we used Crossbow's 
MicaZ motes and TinyOS (operating system).

We used several wireless receivers to simultaneously collect the error traces 
on an 802.11b WLAN.

Traceset

niit/bit_errors/802.15.4

Trace set of 802.15.4 traffic for investigating the biterror process of 802.15.4 low data rate networks.

  • description: The trace set has been collected at NUST School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Rawalpindi. The dataset is collected to investigate biterror process of 802.15.4 low data rate networks.
  • measurement purpose: Bit Error Characterization
  • methodology: Hardware: Crossbow MicaZ motes data rate 250kbps Software: TinyOS 1.x in Cygwin We used Crossbow's MicaZ motes and TinyOS (operating system) to collect residual bit-error traces. To program MicaZ motes the Crossbow MIB510 Serial Programming board and Crossbow MIB600 Ethernet Programming board were used. Same programming boards were later used as base-station to capture the traffic generated by programmed MicaZ motes. TinyOS was modified to forward all received packets at base-station to upper layers (regardless of being received in error at MAC layer). To forward packets from base-station board to attached computer, we used Listen utility provided by TinyOS. However, this utility was also modified to retain erroneous packets.
  • last modified: 2008-09-09
  • dataname: niit/bit_errors/802.15.4
  • version: 20080708
  • change: the initial version.
  • release date: 2008-07-08
  • date/time of measurement start: 2007-04-01
  • date/time of measurement end: 2007-06-30
  • limitation: The data set does not have any information about the packets which have been totally lost. Only those packets are captured which are received completely (although may be in error).

niit/bit_errors/802.15.4 Traces

    • Traces_802.15.4: Traces of 802.15.4 traffic for investigating the biterror process of 802.15.4 low data rate networks.
  • configuration: These traces were collected in four different setups. Each setup is characterized by the distance from the base station and obstructions between sender and the base station. In each experiment, one sender transmitted data to the base station and the other senders were inactive. Distance between a sender and the base station varied from 5 to 12 meters. The senders transmitted fixed-sized 20-byte frames at a rate of 10 frames per second. In each setup, six or more traces were collected. The average number of frames per trace was approximately 31,000. Setups used to collect traces are shown in [Figure: 802.15.4 Data collection setup]. These setups are named based on their geographical location. We observed maximum bit-error rate for setup named Room 3. The reason of high bit-error rate is the presence of concrete wall and longer distance.
  • format: The dataset consists of many files. Each file represents one complete trace. Each file has one frame per line. Frame contents are hexadecimal values. First eleven bytes are header bytes whereas remaining 20 bytes are data bytes. The data byte "AA" represents no error whereas any other value represents error in the received byte. Actual bit in error can be computed by XORing received byte to "AA".
  • description: These traces were collected at NUST School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Rawalpindi to investigate biterror process of 802.15.4 low data rate networks.
  • last modified: 2008-09-09
  • dataname: niit/bit_errors/802.15.4/Traces_802.15.4
  • version: 20080708
  • change: the initial version
  • release date: 2008-07-08
  • date/time of measurement start: 2007-04-01
  • date/time of measurement end: 2007-06-30

niit/bit_errors/802.11

Trace set of 802.11b traffic for investigating the biterror process at MAC layer of 802.11b traces.

  • files: setup_802-11.png, setup_A, setup_802-11.png, setup_B
  • description: This trace set was collected at Wireless and Video (WAVES) Lab at Michigan State University (MSU). The basic purpose of collecting these traces was to investigate bit-error process at MAC layer of 802.11 traces and to study the relationship between Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) at physical layer and biterrors at MAC layer.
  • measurement purpose: Bit Error Characterization
  • methodology: For this study, we consider two different setups to encompass home and office settings. Two of these setups are shown in [Figure: 802.11 Trace Collection Setup]. In Setup A, five wireless receivers were used to simultaneously collect error traces on an 802.11b WLAN. One receiver was placed within clear line-of-sight (LoS) of the access point (AP), while the remaining four receivers were placed at different locations in a room across the hallway. In setup B six receivers were used to simultaneously collect error traces. Three receivers were placed in a room across the hallway, while three receivers were placed (at an extreme edge of the network) in a room 100 feet down the hallway. A wired sender was used to send multicast packets with a predetermined payload on the wireless LAN; multicasting disabled MAC layer retransmissions. Each experiment comprised of one million packets with a payload of 1,000 bytes each. At the physical layer, the auto rate selection feature of the AP was disabled and for each experiment the AP was forced to transmit at a fixed data rate. Each trace collection experiment was repeated for different physical layer (PHY) data rates. For each setup, we collected traces for two distinct packet transmission rates. The transmission rate is controlled by adjusting the time interval t between packets. In setup A we collected traces at 500 Kbps and 1024 Kbps, while in Setup B we collected traces at 750 Kbps and 900 Kbps. For ease of notation, we prefer to label the traces by their PHY data rate and a single number. For each packet, in addition to its header and payload information, the following three additional parameters were also logged at the receivers: - Background Traffic (BT): A four byte number representing the total number of background packets observed between two trace packets; - Signal Strength (S) for the received packet: A one byte number representing the signal strength in dBm; - Silence Value (N) for the received packet: A one byte number which can be said to be representing the noise + interference strength in dBm. We generated bit error traces at all bitrates supported by the standard under various settings of an 802.11b network. Network traffic at many constant bitrates was transmitted over the wireless medium. All the bit error traces were collected at the clients by modifying the wireless device drivers. More specifically, the clients were Linux boxes using DLink DWL-650 wireless PC-Cards with prism2 device drivers. The modified client device drivers passed all the packets to a (link layer) raw socket. Thus the traces collected at the clients included successful (i.e., packets with no errors) and unsuccessful (i.e., packets failing the 802.11 MAC layer checksum) transmissions. These link layer traces were copied in the kernel buffer space from where an application thread periodically concatenated them in the user buffer space. To capture packets at high transmission rates, packet dissectors were implemented inside the device drivers. These packet dissectors ensured that only packets pertinent to our wireless experiment were processed, while all other packets were dropped.
  • last modified: 2008-09-09
  • dataname: niit/bit_errors/802.11
  • version: 20080708
  • change: the initial version.
  • release date: 2008-07-08
  • date/time of measurement start: 2006-06-01
  • date/time of measurement end: 2006-07-31
  • limitation: The data set does not have any information about the packets which have been totally lost. Only those packets are captured which are received completely (although may be in error).

niit/bit_errors/802.11 Traces

    • setup_A: Traces from a 802.11 network with typical home setting for investigating the biterror process at MAC layer of 802.11b traces.
  • configuration: For this trace, we consider a 802.11 network setup for typical home setting. This setup is shown as "Setup A" in [Figure: 802.11 Trace Collection Setup]. In this setup, five wireless receivers were used to simultaneously collect error traces on an 802.11b WLAN. One receiver was placed within clear line-of-sight (LoS) of the access point (AP), while the remaining four receivers were placed at different locations in a room across the hallway. A wired sender was used to send multicast packets with a predetermined payload on the wireless LAN; multicasting disabled MAC layer retransmissions. Each experiment comprised of one million packets with a payload of 1,000 bytes each. At the physical layer, the auto rate selection feature of the AP was disabled and for each experiment the AP was forced to transmit at a fixed data rate. Each trace collection experiment was repeated for different physical layer (PHY) data rates. For this setup, we collected traces for two distinct packet transmission rates. The transmission rate is controlled by adjusting the time interval t between packets. In this setup we collected traces at 500 Kbps and 1024 Kbps. For ease of notation, we prefer to label the traces by their PHY data rate and a single number.
  • format: The dataset consists of two different setups. For each setup, several traces are collected. Name of the files are meaningful. For example, trace_2mbps_500kbps_accros_sniffer1 refers to the trace collected at 2Mbps physical data rate 500Kbps MAC layer data rate and the packet is logged at receiver named sniffer1. Each file represents one complete trace. These traces are in pcap format. Complete frames are present in the trace files. Each frame contains 1000 bytes of data. The data bytes are hexadecimal "AA" (binary 10101010). Actual bit in error can be computed by XORing received byte to "AA".
  • description: These traces were collected from a 802.11 network set up for typical home setting in order to investigate bit-error process at MAC layer of 802.11 traces and to study the relationship between Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) at physical layer and biterrors at MAC layer.
  • last modified: 2008-09-09
  • dataname: niit/bit_errors/802.11/setup_A
  • version: 20080708
  • change: the initial version
  • release date: 2008-07-08
  • date/time of measurement start: 2006-06-01
  • date/time of measurement end: 2006-07-31
    • setup_B: Traces from a 802.11 network with typical office setting for investigating the biterror process at MAC layer of 802.11b traces.
  • configuration: For this trace, we consider a 802.11 network setup for typical office setting. This setup is shown as "Setup B" in [Figure: 802.11 Trace Collection Setup]. In this setup six receivers were used to simultaneously collect error traces. Three receivers were placed in a room across the hallway, while three receivers were placed (at an extreme edge of the network) in a room 100 feet down the hallway. A wired sender was used to send multicast packets with a predetermined payload on the wireless LAN; multicasting disabled MAC layer retransmissions. Each experiment comprised of one million packets with a payload of 1,000 bytes each. At the physical layer, the auto rate selection feature of the AP was disabled and for each experiment the AP was forced to transmit at a fixed data rate. Each trace collection experiment was repeated for different physical layer (PHY) data rates. For this setup, we collected traces for two distinct packet transmission rates. The transmission rate is controlled by adjusting the time interval t between packets. In this setup we collected traces at 750 Kbps and 900 Kbps. For ease of notation, we prefer to label the traces by their PHY data rate and a single number.
  • format: The dataset consists of two different setups. For each setup, several traces are collected. Name of the files are meaningful. For example, trace_2mbps_500kbps_accros_sniffer1 refers to the trace collected at 2Mbps physical data rate 500Kbps MAC layer data rate and the packet is logged at receiver named sniffer1. Each file represents one complete trace. These traces are in pcap format. Complete frames are present in the trace files. Each frame contains 1000 bytes of data. The data bytes are hexadecimal "AA" (binary 10101010). Actual bit in error can be computed by XORing received byte to "AA".
  • description: These traces were collected from a 802.11 network set up for typical office setting in order to investigate bit-error process at MAC layer of 802.11 traces and to study the relationship between Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) at physical layer and biterrors at MAC layer.
  • last modified: 2008-09-09
  • dataname: niit/bit_errors/802.11/setup_B
  • version: 20080708
  • change: the initial version
  • release date: 2008-07-08
  • date/time of measurement start: 2006-06-01
  • date/time of measurement end: 2006-07-31
Instructions: 

The files in this directory are a CRAWDAD dataset hosted by IEEE DataPort. 

About CRAWDAD: the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data At Dartmouth is a data resource for the research community interested in wireless networks and mobile computing. 

CRAWDAD was founded at Dartmouth College in 2004, led by Tristan Henderson, David Kotz, and Chris McDonald. CRAWDAD datasets are hosted by IEEE DataPort as of November 2022. 

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Citation:

Adnan Iqbal, Khurram Shahzad, Syed Ali Khayam, Yongju Cho, niit/bit_errors, https://doi.org/10.15783/C7S88K , Date: 20080708

 

Dataset Files

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File niit-bit_errors-readme.txt1.6 KB

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