CRAWDAD init/robotarm

Citation Author(s):
Dimitri
Block
Niels Hendrik
Fliedner
Daniel
Toews
Uwe
Meier
Submitted by:
CRAWDAD Team
Last updated:
Mon, 07/06/2015 - 08:00
DOI:
10.15783/C7C88V
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Abstract 

Time- and frequency-variant 2.4 GHz ISM band channel gain. 

The time- and frequency-variant channel gain is measured in the presence of an industrial cyclic moving robot arm obstacle for four coexisting wireless nodes for the whole license-free 2.4-GHz-ISM band with a time- and frequency-resolution of 110 microseconds and 1 MHz, respectively. Results for two links are given.

date/time of measurement start: 2015-05-11

date/time of measurement end: 2015-05-11

collection environment: We measured the channel gain of two wireless links with a moving robot arm between the antennas. The robot arm was surrounded by a square ground acrylic glass box, which is placed in an indoor hall. We placed 4 antennas on the acrylic glass box and measured the varying channel gain for about 6.5 seconds.

network configuration: The robot arm is manufactured by KUKA Roboter GmbH, product model KR5 sixx R650. It was parameterized to a periodic movement cycle with repetition times of 1293.6 ms at 100% speed for measurement M1 and 2105.2 ms at 50% speed for measurement M2 to achieve a time fading channel behaviour.

data collection methodology: The vector signal generator (VSG) Rohde and Schwarz SMBV100A was used as a modulated signal source with center frequency of 2.44 GHz. The VSG was transmitting periodic short-time bursts via the wireless channel, seeking approximation of a wide-band Dirac pulse train with a bandwidth above 80 MHz. The real-time spectrum analyzer (RSA) Tektronix RSA 6114A was the signal sink with the same center frequency and an input bandwidth of 80 MHz, measurement duration of 6.5 sec with a time resolution of 110 us. The channel gain is computed based upon the emission measurement of the RSA and the time-independent reference spectrum of the VSG.

sanitization: The measurements have been performed in the presence of disturbing WLAN and Bluetooth communication. In order to eliminate the interference impact, the channel attenuation measurement repetitions are aggregated. The time variant channel gain contains five and three robot arm movement cycles for measurement M1 and M2, respectively. To eliminate the interference impact and sanitization purpose the median value was determined.

limitation: The measurements are not correlated. So, the time reference for each measurement result is randomly.

Traceset

init/robotarm/channel-gain

Time- and frequency-variant 2.4 GHz ISM band channel gain

Both traces contain a ZIP-archive of channel gain CSV-files

  • file: channel-gain-M2.zip
  • measurement purpose: MAC Protocol Development, Opportunistic Connectivity

init/robotarm/channel-gain Traces

  • M1 Robot arm at full-speed. Measurement are performed with the robot arm with repetition times of 1293.6 ms at 100% speed.
    • format: The gain values are stored in CSV-files as floats. They are seperated by commas such as: 

-51.3,-49.1,-50.1, ....
-50.1,-48.2,-50.5, ...
    ...
The columns represent the frequency bins 2400 MHz, 2401 MHz, ... 2480 MHz. The rows represent the time instances 0 ms, 0.11 ms, 0.22 ms, ... 1293.6 ms. 
In total there are 11844 rows and 81 columns.

  • M2 Robot arm at half-speed. Measurement are performed with the robot arm with repetition times of 2105.2 ms at 50% speed. 
    • format: The gain values are stored in CSV-files as floats. They are seperated by commas such as: 

-51.3,-49.1,-50.1, ....
-50.1,-48.2,-50.5, ...
    ...
The columns represent the frequency bins 2400 MHz, 2401 MHz, ... 2480 MHz. The rows represent the time instances 0 ms, 0.11 ms, 0.22 ms, ... 2105.2 ms. 
In total there are 19275 rows and 81 columns.

Instructions: 

The files in this directory are a CRAWDAD dataset hosted by IEEE DataPort. 

About CRAWDAD: the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data At Dartmouth is a data resource for the research community interested in wireless networks and mobile computing. 

CRAWDAD was founded at Dartmouth College in 2004, led by Tristan Henderson, David Kotz, and Chris McDonald. CRAWDAD datasets are hosted by IEEE DataPort as of November 2022. 

Note: Please use the Data in an ethical and responsible way with the aim of doing no harm to any person or entity for the benefit of society at large. Please respect the privacy of any human subjects whose wireless-network activity is captured by the Data and comply with all applicable laws, including without limitation such applicable laws pertaining to the protection of personal information, security of data, and data breaches. Please do not apply, adapt or develop algorithms for the extraction of the true identity of users and other information of a personal nature, which might constitute personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws. Do not publish or otherwise disclose to any other person or entity any information that constitutes personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws derived from the Data through manual or automated techniques. 

Please acknowledge the source of the Data in any publications or presentations reporting use of this Data. 

Citation:

Dimitri Block, Niels Hendrik Fliedner, Daniel Toews, Uwe Meier, init/robotarm, https://doi.org/10.15783/C7C88V , Date: 20150706

Dataset Files

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Documentation

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File init-robotarm-readme.txt1.6 KB

These datasets are part of Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data (CRAWDAD). CRAWDAD began in 2004 at Dartmouth College as a place to share wireless network data with the research community. Its purpose was to enable access to data from real networks and real mobile users at a time when collecting such data was challenging and expensive. The archive has continued to grow since its inception, and starting in summer 2022 is being housed on IEEE DataPort.

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