CRAWDAD dartmouth/zigbee_radio

Citation Author(s):
Emiliano
Miluzzo
Dartmouth College
Xiao
Zheng
Dartmouth College
Kristof
Fodor
Ericsson Research
Submitted by:
CRAWDAD Team
Last updated:
Mon, 01/07/2008 - 08:00
DOI:
10.15783/C7SG6W
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Abstract 

Dataset of radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications.

The dataset contains results from a simple yet systematic set of benchmark experiments that offer a number of important insights into the radio characteristics of mobile 802.15.4 person-to-person communications.

date/time of measurement start: 2007-08-12

collection environment: Future mobile sensing systems are being designed using 802.15.4 low-power short-range radios for a diverse set of devices from embedded mobile motes to sensor-enabled cellphones in support, for example, of people-centric sensing applications. However, there is little known about the use of 802.15.4 in mobile sensor settings nor its impact on the performance of future communication architectures. We conducted a simple yet systematic set of benchmark experiments that can offer a number of important insights into the radio characteristics of mobile 802.15.4 person-to-person communication.

network configuration: For all experiments we use two Tmote Invents operating in the 2.4 GHz band, one acting as a transmitter and the other as a receiver. A different two are chosen for each experiment from a large pool of Invents to avoid biases specific to a particular Invent's hardware. The transmitter is programmed to send packets at the maximum transmission power (0 dBm) and transmission rate.

data collection methodology: We investigate metrics like RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput targeting studies to characterize the radio environment in wireless sensor networks. We also measure the effective contact time, i.e., the time window during which nodes are in radio contact with each other and have enough available bandwidth between them to support data transfer.

We carry out our experiments according to three benchmarks:

i) outdoor experiments in a soccer field away from obstacles and radio interference in the 802.15.4 radio band,

ii) outdoor experiments along a sidewalk which is an example of urban environment, and,

iii) indoors experiments in a 55 meter hallway in an office building.

In all the cases people were moving at walking speed. We repeat the experiments positioning the transmitter and receiver nodes at different places on the body, (i.e., on the chest front hanging on from a necklace, inside a pocket). This choice is motivated by the fact that we are also interested in quantifying the impact of the position on the body where the nodes are more likely to be carried. We run each experiment five times and calculate the 95% confidence interval.

Tracesets

Soccer_field 

Traceset of outdoor experiments in a soccer field measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications.

  • file: Soccer_field.tar.gz
  • description: The traceset contains results from outdoor experiments in a soccer field away from obstacles and radio interference to get insights into the radio characteristics of mobile 802.15.4 person-to-person communications.
  • measurement purpose: Network Performance Analysis
  • methodology: We perform this experiment in a soccer field out of town away from obstacles and radio activity to minimize any external source of interference and perturbation on the measurements. The soccer field is in a rural setting and not in a town. The transmitter sends 18 byte long packets as fast as possible and the receiver retrieves and stores the RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator) and LQI (Link Quality Indicator) from each packet received from the sender. We also record the throughput of the sender measured at the receiver. We draw concentric circles with different radius on the ground, the center being the position of the sender node during the measurements. The radius are: 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 meters. Along the circumference of each circle we place equally spaced markers that identify the distance walked along the circles. The experiment consists of a stationary person standing in the center of the circles wearing a necklace mote and facing a fixed direction while the other person walks along each circle wearing a necklace mote as well. Each time the person carrying the receiver passes by a marker the user button on the receiver mote is clicked and a counter, which represents an abstraction of the distance walked along the circle, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values are stored in bin structures identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values for a position denoted by i in the circle are an average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). This way we are able to produce a 360 degrees RSSI, LQI, and throughput map around the transmitter. To have a set of comparison points we also perform LoS (Line of Sight) measurements between the transmitter and the receiver where the transmitter is placed in the center of the circles in such a way so there are no obstacles in the proximity and the transmitter and receiver are lifted 1.5 meters above the ground. The receiver is slowly moved along the concentric circles keeping the LoS condition with the transmitter. The receiver was ~1 meter far away from the person carrying it. This way we obtain 360 degrees LoS maps around the transmitter for throughput, LQI, and RSSI measured at the receiver.

Soccer_field Traces

  • Soccer_field/LOS: Traces of outdor experiments in a soccer field conducting LoS (Line of Sight) measurements of the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications.
    • configuration: We perform this experiment in a soccer field out of town away from obstacles and radio activity to minimize any external source of interference and perturbation on the measurements. The soccer field is in a rural setting and not in a town. The transmitter sends 18 byte long packets as fast as possible and the receiver retrieves and stores the RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator) and LQI (Link Quality Indicator) from each packet received from the sender. We also record the throughput of the sender measured at the receiver. We draw concentric circles with different radius on the ground, the center being the position of the sender node during the measurements. The radius are: 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 meters. Along the circumference of each circle we place equally spaced markers that identify the distance walked along the circles. The experiment consists of a stationary person standing in the center of the circles wearing a necklace mote and facing a fixed direction while the other person walks along each circle wearing a necklace mote as well. Each time the person carrying the receiver passes by a marker the user button on the receiver mote is clicked and a counter, which represents an abstraction of the distance walked along the circle, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values are stored in bin structures identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values for a position denoted by i in the circle are an average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). This way we are able to produce a 360 degrees RSSI, LQI, and throughput map around the transmitter. To have a set of comparison points we also perform LoS (Line of Sight) measurements between the transmitter and the receiver where the transmitter is placed in the center of the circles in such a way so there are no obstacles in the proximity and the transmitter and receiver are lifted 1.5 meters above the ground. The receiver is slowly moved along the concentric circles keeping the LoS condition with the transmitter. The receiver was ~1 meter far away from the person carrying it. This way we obtain 360 degrees LoS maps around the transmitter for throughput, LQI, and RSSI measured at the receive
    • format:  Format of trace data - 
      • The file name is associated to the radius value the data has been collected for.
      • The columns in the file are
        • Angle(Degree)
        • RSSI(dBm) L
        • QI Throughput(bps)
  • Soccer_field/people: Traces of outdor experiments in a soccer field measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications.
    • configuration: We perform this experiment in a soccer field out of town away from obstacles and radio activity to minimize any external source of interference and perturbation on the measurements. The soccer field is in a rural setting and not in a town. The transmitter sends 18 byte long packets as fast as possible and the receiver retrieves and stores the RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator) and LQI (Link Quality Indicator) from each packet received from the sender. We also record the throughput of the sender measured at the receiver. We draw concentric circles with different radius on the ground, the center being the position of the sender node during the measurements. The radius are: 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 meters. Along the circumference of each circle we place equally spaced markers that identify the distance walked along the circles. The experiment consists of a stationary person standing in the center of the circles wearing a necklace mote and facing a fixed direction while the other person walks along each circle wearing a necklace mote as well. Each time the person carrying the receiver passes by a marker the user button on the receiver mote is clicked and a counter, which represents an abstraction of the distance walked along the circle, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values are stored in bin structures identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values for a position denoted by i in the circle are an average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). This way we are able to produce a 360 degrees RSSI, LQI, and throughput map around the transmitter.
    • format:  Format of trace data
      • The file name is associated to the radius value the data has been collected for.
      • The columns in the file are
        • Angle(Degree)
        • RSSI(dBm)
        • LQI Throughput(bps)

Sidewalk

Traceset of outdor experiments in a sidewalk measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications.

  • file:Sidewalk.tar.gz
  • descriptionThe traceset contains results from outdoor experiments along a sidewalk which is an example of urban environment.
  • measurement purpose: Network Performance Analysis
  • methodology: This set of experiments show the radio behaviour during a mobile-to-mobile communication rendezvous in the common case of people carrying short range radio nodes and crossing each other in a typical urban environment: a sidewalk. In this case we record RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput values measured at the receiver as a function of the transmitter and receiver distance. The experiments consists of having two people carrying a transmitting and a receiving mote walking toward each other from a long distance and eventually passing and crossing each other. The sidewalk runs along a street which is about 15 meters away from buildings on both sides. Since the measurements are reported as a function of the distance between the sender and the receiver we mark a 160 meter portion of the sidewalk. Each marker is 2 meters apart and every measurement starts with the two people located at a distance of 160 meters (in order to start the experiment by having them out of radio contact). Every time each person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i with the transmitter at position j are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance. Two cases are considered: the mote is hung on the chest as the necklace case and the mote is carried in the pocket as the pocket case.

Sidewalk Traces

  • Sidewalk/necklace: Traces of outdor experiments in a sidewalk measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications between two people carrying a necklace mote.
    • configuration: This set of experiments show the radio behaviour during a mobile-to-mobile communication rendezvous in the common case of people carrying short range radio nodes and crossing each other in a typical urban environment: a sidewalk. In this case we record RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput values measured at the receiver as a function of the transmitter and receiver distance. The experiments consists of having two people carrying a transmitting and a receiving mote, hanging them on the chest like wearing a necklace, walking toward each other from a long distance and eventually passing and crossing each other. The sidewalk runs along a street which is about 15 meters away from buildings on both sides. Since the measurements are reported as a function of the distance between the sender and the receiver we mark a 160 meter portion of the sidewalk. Each marker is 2 meters apart and every measurement starts with the two people located at a distance of 160 meters (in order to start the experiment by having them out of radio contact). Every time each person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i with the transmitter at position j are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance.
    • format: The columns in the file are:
      • Distance(meters)
      • value (RSSI(dBm), LQI or Throughput(bps))
      • standard deviation.
  • Sidewalk/pocket: Traces of outdor experiments in a sidewalk measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications between two people carrying motes in their pocket.
    • configuration: This set of experiments show the radio behaviour during a mobile-to-mobile communication rendezvous in the common case of people carrying short range radio nodes and crossing each other in a typical urban environment: a sidewalk. In this case we record RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput values measured at the receiver as a function of the transmitter and receiver distance. The experiments consists of having two people carrying a transmitting and a receiving mote in their pockets walking toward each other from a long distance and eventually passing and crossing each other. The sidewalk runs along a street which is about 15 meters away from buildings on both sides. Since the measurements are reported as a function of the distance between the sender and the receiver we mark a 160 meter portion of the sidewalk. Each marker is 2 meters apart and every measurement starts with the two people located at a distance of 160 meters (in order to start the experiment by having them out of radio contact). Every time each person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i with the transmitter at position j are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance.
    • format: Format of trace data - the columns in the file are:
      • Distance(meters)
      • value(RSSI(dBm), LQI or Throughput(bps))
      • standard deviation.

Hallway_people crossing

Traceset of indoor experiments in a hallway in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications.

  • file: Hallway_peoplecrossing.tar.gz
  • descriptionThe traceset contains results from indoors experiments in a 55 meter hallway in an office building where people approach each other from a long distance.
  • measurement purpose: Network Performance Analysis
  • methodology: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. The hallway represents one of the common indoor scenarios where people approach each other from a long distance, get in radio contact and pass each other. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway is marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the people at the far edges of the hallway. Every time each person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i with the transmitter at position j are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance. Two cases are considered: the mote is hung on the chest as the necklace case and the mote is carried in the pocket as the pocket case.

Hallway_people Traces

  • Hallway_peoplecrossing/necklace: Traces of indoor experiments in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications between two people carrying a necklace mote.
    • configuration: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. The hallway represents one of the common indoor scenarios where people carrying a necklace mote approach each other from a long distance, get in radio contact and pass each other. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway is marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the people at the far edges of the hallway. Every time each person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i with the transmitter at position j are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance.
    • format: The columns in the file are:
      • Distance(meters)
      • value(RSSI(dBm), LQI or Throughput(bps))
      • standard deviation
  • Hallway_peoplecrossing/pocket: Traces of indoor experiments in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications between two people carrying motes in their pocket.
    • configuration: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. The hallway represents one of the common indoor scenarios where people carrying motes in their pocket approach each other from a long distance, get in radio contact and pass each other. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway is marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the people at the far edges of the hallway. Every time each person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i with the transmitter at position j are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance.
    • format: The columns in the file are:
      • Distance(meters)
      • value(RSSI(dBm), LQI or Throughput(bps))
      • standard deviation

Hallway_tx_at_the_edge

Traceset of indoor experiments in a hallway in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications.

  • file: Hallway_tx_at_the_edge.tar.gz
  • description: The traceset contains results from indoors experiments in a 55 meter hallway in an office building where the transmitter is statically positioned at one edge of the hallway and one people carrying the receiver walking away from it.
  • measurement purpose: Network Performance Analysis
  • methodology: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway is marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the transmitter statically positioned at one edge of the hallway and one people carrying the receiver walking away from it. Every time each person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance. Three cases are considered: the mote is not on people as the Line of Sight case, the mote is hung on the chest as the necklace case and the mote is carried in the pocket as the pocket case.

Hallway_tx_at_the_edge Traces

  • Hallway_tx_at_the_edge/LOS: Traces of indoor experiments in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications with the transmitter positioned at one edge of the hallway and the receiver moving away from it in LOS condition.
    • configuration: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway is marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the transmitter statically positioned at one edge of the hallway and the receiver moving away from it. For LOS condition, the mote is not on people in this experiment. Every time each mote encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance.
    • format: The columns in the file are: Distance(meters) value(RSSI(dBm), LQI or Throughput(bps)) standard deviation
  • Hallway_tx_at_the_edge/necklace: Traces of indoor experiments in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications with the transmitter positioned at one edge of the hallway and the receiver (carried as a necklace) moving away from it.
    • configuration: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway is marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the transmitter statically positioned at one edge of the hallway and one people carrying the receiver as a necklace walking away from it. Every time each person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance.
    • format: The columns in the file are:
      • Distance(meters)
      • value(RSSI(dBm), LQI or Throughput(bps))
      • standard deviation.

Hallway_turning_corners

Traceset of indoor experiments in a hallway in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications.

  • file: Hallway_turning_corners.tar.gz
  • description: The traceset contains results from indoors experiments in a 55 meter hallway in an office building where the person carrying the receiver node turns several corners in the building.
  • measurement purpose: Network Performance Analysis
  • methodology: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway and its two wings are marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the transmitter statically positioned in the middle of the hallway, hanging from the ceiling in LoS (Line of Sight) contact with the rest of the hallway. The receiver node is carried starting from one wing of the hallway, turning the corner after 20 meters into the hallway, and turning another corner after 70 meters out of the hallway into the other wing. Every time the person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance. Two cases are considered: the mote is hung on the chest as the necklace case and the mote is carried in the pocket as the pocket case.

Hallway_turning_corners Traces

  • Hallway_turning_corners/neclace: Traces of indoor experiments in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications where the person carrying the receiver node as a necklace turns corners in the building.
    • configuration: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway and its two wings are marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the transmitter statically positioned in the middle of the hallway, hanging from the ceiling in LoS (Line of Sight) contact with the rest of the hallway. The receiver node is carried starting from one wing of the hallway, turning the corner after 20 meters into the hallway, and turning another corner after 70 meters out of the hallway into the other wing. Every time the person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance.
    • format: The columns in the file are: Distance(meters) value(RSSI(dBm), LQI or Throughput(bps)) standard deviation
  • Hallway_turning_corners/pocket: Traces of indoor experiments in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications where the person carrying the receiver node in the pocket turns corners in the building.
    • configuration: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway and its two wings are marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the transmitter statically positioned in the middle of the hallway, hanging from the ceiling in LoS (Line of Sight) contact with the rest of the hallway. The receiver node is carried starting from one wing of the hallway, turning the corner after 20 meters into the hallway, and turning another corner after 70 meters out of the hallway into the other wing. Every time the person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance.
    • format: The columns in the file are:
      • Distance(meters)
      • value(RSSI(dBm), LQI or Throughput(bps))
      • standard deviation

Hallway_different_bodies

Traceset of indoor experiments in a hallway in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications.

  • file: Hallway_different_bodies.tar.gz
  • description: The traceset contains results from indoors experiments in a 55 meter hallway in an office building where the receiver node is carried by two people with different body sizes.
  • measurement purpose: Network Performance Analysis
  • methodology: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway is marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the transmitter statically positioned at one edge of the hallway, hanging from the ceiling in LoS (Line of Sight) contact with the rest of the hallway. The receiver node is carried starting under the transmitter node to the other end of the hallway by two people with different body sizes. Person A's weight and height are 55 Kg and 1.65 meters respectively, whereas Person B's weight and height are 78 Kg and 1.79 meters, respectively. Every time the person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance.

Hallway_different_bodies Traces

  • Hallway_different_bodies/personA: Traces of indoor experiments in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications where the receiver node is carried by a person with relatively small body size.
    •  configuration: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway is marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the transmitter statically positioned at one edge of the hallway, hanging from the ceiling in LoS (Line of Sight) contact with the rest of the hallway. The receiver node is carried starting under the transmitter node to the other end of the hallway by a person (called Person A) whose weight and height are 55 Kg and 1.65 meters. Every time the person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance.
    • format:The columns in the file are:
      • Distance(meters)
      • value(RSSI(dBm), LQI or Throughput(bps))
      • standard deviation
  • Hallway_different_bodies/personB: Traces of indoor experiments in an office building measuring the radio characteristics of 802.15.4 mobile person-to-person communications where the receiver node is carried by a person with relatively big body size.
    • configuration: This experiment is carried in a building hallway of an office building. In this case we take RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator), LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and throughput measurements at the receiver as a function of the transmitter-receiver distance. The 55 meter hallway is marked by equally spaced markers every 2 meters and starting the experiments with the transmitter statically positioned at one edge of the hallway, hanging from the ceiling in LoS (Line of Sight) contact with the rest of the hallway. The receiver node is carried starting under the transmitter node to the other end of the hallway by a person (called Person B) whose weight and height are 78 Kg and 1.79 meters. Every time the person encounters a marker, the user button of the mote is clicked and a counter, which again represents an abstraction of the distance walked, is incremented. Every RSSI and LQI sample is stamped with the latest marker value which means that the RSSI and LQI values fall into bins identified by the number of markers minus one. The RSSI, LQI, and throughput values at the receiver at position i are calculated as the average of the RSSI, LQI, and throughput values collected by the receiver between position i and i+1 (assuming the receiver moves according to the i to i+1 direction). By knowing the starting location of the nodes it is possible to determine the relative sender-receiver distance and an RSSI, LQI, and throughput map for each distance.
    • format: The columns in the file are: Distance(meters) value(RSSI(dBm), LQI or Throughput(bps)) standard deviation
Instructions: 

The files in this directory are a CRAWDAD dataset hosted by IEEE DataPort. 

About CRAWDAD: the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data At Dartmouth is a data resource for the research community interested in wireless networks and mobile computing. 

CRAWDAD was founded at Dartmouth College in 2004, led by Tristan Henderson, David Kotz, and Chris McDonald. CRAWDAD datasets are hosted by IEEE DataPort as of November 2022. 

Note: Please use the Data in an ethical and responsible way with the aim of doing no harm to any person or entity for the benefit of society at large. Please respect the privacy of any human subjects whose wireless-network activity is captured by the Data and comply with all applicable laws, including without limitation such applicable laws pertaining to the protection of personal information, security of data, and data breaches. Please do not apply, adapt or develop algorithms for the extraction of the true identity of users and other information of a personal nature, which might constitute personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws. Do not publish or otherwise disclose to any other person or entity any information that constitutes personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws derived from the Data through manual or automated techniques. 

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Citation:

Emiliano Miluzzo, Xiao Zheng, Kristof Fodor, dartmouth/zigbee_radio, https://doi.org/10.15783/C7SG6W , Date: 20080107

Dataset Files

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Documentation

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File dartmouth-zigbee_radio-readme.txt1.59 KB

These datasets are part of Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data (CRAWDAD). CRAWDAD began in 2004 at Dartmouth College as a place to share wireless network data with the research community. Its purpose was to enable access to data from real networks and real mobile users at a time when collecting such data was challenging and expensive. The archive has continued to grow since its inception, and starting in summer 2022 is being housed on IEEE DataPort.

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