CRAWDAD cu/cu_wart

Citation Author(s):
Caleb
Phillips
Eric W.
Anderson
Carnegie Mellon University
Submitted by:
CRAWDAD Team
Last updated:
Mon, 10/24/2011 - 08:00
DOI:
10.15783/C7TP4H
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Abstract 

Dataset of RSS measurements collected at the University of Colorado Wide-Area Radio Testbed.

This data was collected by Caleb Phillips at the University of Colorado (CU). It contains RSS measurements (together with GPS data) collected using the CU Wide Area Radio Testbed (CU-WART), which involves seven 802.11 APs with phased array antennas mounted on university buildings.

date/time of measurement start: 2010-05-31 

collection environment:The datatset was collected from the University of Colorado Wide-Area Radio Testbed (WART) using a mobile node (a Samsung brand ``netbook'') with a pairof diversity antennas that collected data from 6 rooftop WART nodes.

network configuration: WART consists of 8 phased array antenna nodes (7 of them operational) mounted to the rooftops of Colorado University and spans an area of 1.8 x 1.4 kilometers. The entire testbed is linked together via wired Ethernet and can be controlled from a single administration point.

data collection methodology: The mobile node was configured to transmit and log beacon packets from WART. The mobile node was additionally instrumented with a USB GPS receiver that was used both to keep a log of position and to synchronize the system clock so that the wireless trace was in sync with the GPS position log. During the experiment, the mobile node was attached to an elevated (nonconducting) platform on the front of a bicycle. The bicycle was pedaled around the CU campus on pedestrian paths, streets, and in parking lots.

sanitization: Because it contains identifiers for only research hardware, this data has not been anonymized in any way.

limitation: The commodity radios do exhibit a certain amount of error in RSS measurements. After calibration, we found that any reasonable confidence level can be achieved by taking a practical number of samples. 

Traceset

cu/cu_wart/2010

Traceset of RSS measurements collected at the University of Colorado Wide-Area Radio Testbed in 2010.

  • file: cu_wart.tar.gz
  • description: This data was collected by Caleb Phillips for the purpose of path loss modeling work at the University of Colorado (CU) in 2010. It contains RSS measurements (together with GPS data) collected using the CU Wide Area Radio Testbed (CU-WART), which involves seven 802.11 APs with phased array antennas mounted on university buildings.
  • measurement purpose: Network Performance Analysis
  • methodology: This data was collected using a mobile node (a Samsung brand "netbook") with a pair of diversity antennas. In this experiment, the 6 rooftop CU WART nodes were configured to transmit 80 byte "beacon" packets every 0.5 + U(0.0,0.5) seconds, where U(X,Y) is a uniformly distributed random number between X and Y. Beacons are configured to transmit at 1 Mbps, so that possible effects of Doppler spread on higher datarate waveforms are avoided. Similarly, the mobile device was configured to transmit beacons at the same rate. Meanwhile, each rooftop testbed node was configured to its 9 dBi omnidirectional antenna pattern. All nodes, including the mobile node, were configured to log packets using a second monitor mode (promiscuous) wireless interface. The mobile node was additionally instrumented with a USB GPS receiver that was used both to keep a log of position and to synchronize the system clock so that the wireless trace was in sync with the GPS position log. During the experiment, the mobile node was attached to an elevated (nonconducting) platform on the front of a bicycle.

Traces

cu/cu_wart/2010/path_loss

Trace of RSS measurements collected at the University of Colorado Wide-Area Radio Testbed in 2010.

This data was collected by Caleb Phillips for the purpose of path loss modeling work at the University of Colorado (CU) in 2010. It contains RSS measurements (together with GPS data) collected using the CU Wide Area Radio Testbed (CU-WART), which involves seven 802.11 APs with phased array antennas mounted on university buildings

    • configuration: In this experiment, the 6 rooftop CU WART nodes were configured to transmit 80 byte "beacon" packets every 0.5 + U(0.0,0.5) seconds, where U(X,Y) is a uniformly distributed random number between X and Y. Beacons are configured to transmit at 1 Mbps, so that possible effects of Doppler spread on higher datarate waveforms are avoided. Similarly, the mobile device was configured to transmit beacons at the same rate. Meanwhile, each rooftop testbed node was configured to its 9 dBi omnidirectional antenna pattern. All nodes, including the mobile node, were configured to log packets using a second monitor mode (promiscuous) wireless interface. The mobile node was additionally instrumented with a USB GPS receiver that was used both to keep a log of position and to synchronize the system clock so that the wireless trace was in sync with the GPS position log. During the experiment, the mobile node was attached to an elevated (nonconducting) platform on the front of a bicycle.
    • format: There are three files. Of them, upstream.txt and downstream.txt contain the signal strength measurements. These should be fairly self-explanatory. The gps.time.err column is the difference in seconds between when the measurement was made and the closest GPS point (and hence, indicates the accuracy of the GPS location). The AP the frame was received by (or sent by) is a numeric identifier (nid), which refers to one of the seven sites given in the YAML at the end of this file. Other details such as antenna height, tx power, gain, orientation, and location are given in the YAML as well. The third file, gps.dat is the output of the GPS track generated by gpsd on the mobile receiver, using the following command:

gpspipe -t -w -f gps.dat

Instructions: 

The files in this directory are a CRAWDAD dataset hosted by IEEE DataPort. 

About CRAWDAD: the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data At Dartmouth is a data resource for the research community interested in wireless networks and mobile computing. 

CRAWDAD was founded at Dartmouth College in 2004, led by Tristan Henderson, David Kotz, and Chris McDonald. CRAWDAD datasets are hosted by IEEE DataPort as of November 2022. 

Note: Please use the Data in an ethical and responsible way with the aim of doing no harm to any person or entity for the benefit of society at large. Please respect the privacy of any human subjects whose wireless-network activity is captured by the Data and comply with all applicable laws, including without limitation such applicable laws pertaining to the protection of personal information, security of data, and data breaches. Please do not apply, adapt or develop algorithms for the extraction of the true identity of users and other information of a personal nature, which might constitute personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws. Do not publish or otherwise disclose to any other person or entity any information that constitutes personally identifiable information or protected health information under any such applicable laws derived from the Data through manual or automated techniques. 

Please acknowledge the source of the Data in any publications or presentations reporting use of this Data. 

Citation:

Caleb Phillips, Eric W. Anderson, Eric W. Anderson, cu/cu_wart, https://doi.org/10.15783/C7TP4H , Date: 20111024

 

Dataset Files

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Documentation

AttachmentSize
File cu-cu_wart-readme.txt1.59 KB

These datasets are part of Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data (CRAWDAD). CRAWDAD began in 2004 at Dartmouth College as a place to share wireless network data with the research community. Its purpose was to enable access to data from real networks and real mobile users at a time when collecting such data was challenging and expensive. The archive has continued to grow since its inception, and starting in summer 2022 is being housed on IEEE DataPort.

Questions about CRAWDAD? See our CRAWDAD FAQ. Interested in submitting your dataset to the CRAWDAD collection? Get started, by submitting an Open Access Dataset.